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We have got a class, let it be named AttributeUpdater in our project handling the copying of values from one entity to another. The core method traverses through the attributes of an entity and copies them as specified into the second one. During that loop the AttributeUpdater collects all reports, which contain information about what value was overwritten during copying, into a nice list for eventual logging purposes. This list is deleted in case that the old entity which values got overwritten was never persisted into the database, because in that case you only would overwrite default values and logging that is deemed redundant. In pseudo Java code:

public class AttributeUpdater {
  public static CopyResult updateAttributes(Entity source, Entity target, String[] attributes) {
    List<CopyReport> reports = new ArrayList<CopyReport>();
    for(String attribute : attributes) {
          reports.add(copy(source, target, attribute));
    }
    if(target.isNotPersisted()) {
      reports.clear();
    }
    return new CopyResult(reports);
  }
}

Now someone got the epiphany that there is one case in which the reports actually matter even if the entity has not been persisted yet. This would not be that big of a deal if I could just add another parameter to the method signature, but that is somewhat out of option due to the actual structure of the class and the amount of required refractoring. Since the method is static the only other solution I came up with is adding a flag as a static field and setting it just before the function call.

public class AttributeUpdater {

  public static final ThreadLocal<Boolean> isDeletionEnabled = new ThreadLocal<Boolean> {
      @Override protected Boolean initialValue() {
             return Boolean.TRUE;
      }      

  public static Boolean getDeletionEnabled() { return isDeletionEnabled.get(); }
  public static void setDeletionEnabled(Boolean b) { isDeletionEnabled.set(b); }

  public static CopyResult updateAttributes(Entity source, Entity target, String[] attributes) {
    List<CopyReport> reports = new ArrayList<CopyReport>();
    for(String attribute : attributes) {
          reports.add(copy(source, target, attribute));
    }
    if(isDeletionEnabled.get() && target.isNotPersisted()) {
      reports.clear();
    }
    return new CopyResult(reports);
  }
}

ThreadLocal is a container used for thread-safety. This solution, while it does the job, has at least for me one major drawback: for all the other methods which assume that the reports are deleted there is now no way of guaranteeing that those reports will be deleted as expected. Again refractoring is not an option. So I came up with this:

public class AttributeUpdater {

  private static final ThreadLocal<Boolean> isDeletionEnabled = new ThreadLocal<Boolean> {
      @Override protected Boolean initialValue() {
             return Boolean.TRUE;
      }      

  public static Boolean getDeletionEnabled() { return isDeletionEnabled.get(); }
  public static void disableDeletionForNextCall() { isDeletionEnabled.set(Boolean.FALSE); }

  public static CopyResult updateAttributes(Entity source, Entity target, String[] attributes) {
    List<CopyReport> reports = new ArrayList<CopyReport>();
    for(String attribute : attributes) {
          reports.add(copy(source, target, attribute));
    }
    if(isDeletionEnabled.get() && target.isNotPersisted()) {
      reports.clear();
    }
    isDeletionEnabled.set(Boolean.TRUE);
    return new CopyResult(reports);
  }
}

This way I can guarantee that for old code the function will always work like it did before the change. The downside to this solution is, especially for nested entities, that I am going to be accessing the ThreadLocal-Container a lot - Iteration over one of those means calling disableDeletionForNextCall() for each nested element. Also as the method is called a lot overall there are valid performance concerns.

TL;DR: Look at pseudo Java source code. First one is old code, second and third are different attempts to allow deletion disabling. Parameters cannot be added to method signature.

Is there a possibility to determine which solution is better or is this merely a philosophical issue? Or is there even a better solution to this problem?

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1  
Have you seen the awesome refactoring capabilities of eclipse (which is probably also available in other IDEs)? Click method, hit ALT+SHIFT+C (change method signature) add a parameter and you are pretty much done. Or add a flag to source, target or attributes. Also don't add stuff in the first place when you know that you are going to clear the list afterwards. Accessing / setting your ThreadLocal is very cheap compared to that. –  zapl Sep 2 '12 at 22:27
    
Can you subclass it and add the method parameter in the subclass? –  bastibe Sep 3 '12 at 6:07
    
Or maybe, you can implement a new method that is the same as the existing one, except it behaves the way you want it. –  bastibe Sep 3 '12 at 6:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The obvious way to decide which solution is better in terms of performance would be benchmarking this. As both solutions access the thread-local variable at least for reading, I doubt that they would differ too much. You could perhaps combine them like this:

if(!isDeletionEnabled.get())
  isDeletionEnabled.set(Boolean.TRUE);
else if (target.isNotPersisted())
  reports.clear();

In this case, you will have the benefit of the second solution (guaranteed resetting of the flag) without unneccessary writes.

I doubt there will be much practical difference. With a bit of luck, the HotSpot JVM will compile the thread local variable into some nice native code which works without too much of a performance penalty, though I have no actual experience there.

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