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Overloading Arithmetic Operators in JavaScript?

Is it possible to add Javascript Objects in a custom way? Javascript allows you to use the + symbol to merge Strings together as well as add Numbers together.

I am wondering if you could define new ways for things to be merged such as adding arrays. What I'm looking for is something like this:

var output = [0,1,2] + [3,4,5];
console.log(output);
//I want this to log [3,5,7]

I know I could easily do this with some addArray() function but I was wondering if it can be done by using the + symbol.

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marked as duplicate by James McLaughlin, Evert, João Silva, jfriend00, sdcvvc Sep 3 '12 at 7:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You mean [3, 5, 7]? –  Waleed Khan Sep 2 '12 at 22:49
    
Wow, I can't believe I wrote it as that. –  Evan Kennedy Sep 2 '12 at 22:50
    
This sort of thing is more common in functional languages or math packages, which Javascript is neither. In this case, for an imperative language, I think that the expected behavior of + is array concatenation. –  Waleed Khan Sep 2 '12 at 22:51
    
I was wondering if it can be done by using the + symbol Seems like you already ran this in the console, so you probably have the answer to your question already, no? –  Fabrício Matté Sep 2 '12 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, Javascript does not support operator overloading and there is no built-in functionality to do this.

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Is it possible to add Javascript Objects in a custom way?

Yes, you can write your own addObject function.

Javascript allows you to use the + symbol to [concatenate] Strings together as well as add Numbers together.

ECMA-262 defines whether the '+' punctuator is treated as a unary or addition operator in expressions. As Mat says, you can't overload it. Even if you could, it doesn't seem like a good idea to change its behaviour since it's already used for 3 different things and has a specified behaviour for "adding" arrays like [1,2] + [3,4].

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