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The following program determines prime variables. Values that return a remainder (p%d) for all values of d greater than 1 and less than p set the value of isPrime equal to "1".

- (int)someMethod
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        int isPrime;
        for (int p = 2; p <= 50; ++p) {
            isPrime = 1;

            for (int d = 2; d < p; ++d) {

                if ( p % d == 0)
                    isPrime = 0;

                if ( isPrime != 0)
                    NSLog (@"%i ", p);
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

My question is, why is that the first "for" statement proceeds immediately after incrementing by "1" whereas in the 2nd "for" statement, the loop proceeds until the value of d is no longer less than p before moving on to the final "if" statement and NSLog.

If this question is not clear, for example, if the value of p is 14, the program proceeds as follows:

  1. p will increment by 1 to become 15
  2. the variable isPrime will be set to 1
  3. the value of d will be set to 2
  4. p%d will be calculated,
  5. the result will not be equal to 0, therefore the for statement will be skipped over
  6. THEN the value of d will, for some reason that I do not understand, increment to 3 and the loop will continue until d is equal to 15, INSTEAD of simply moving on to to the if statement and the NSLog, which would display "15". Why is it that the second "for" loop continues to loop within the "if" statement, incrementing d, whereas the first loop increments p once and then moves on?
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Try cleaning up the formatting of your post. –  endy Sep 3 '12 at 0:29
    
Cleaned up code, is easier to fix! –  Vikings Sep 3 '12 at 0:46
    
Are you sure you typed this correctly? There's a pretty serious bug caused by a misplaced bracket. The closing bracket } for the inner for loop should come right after if( p % d == 0 ){ isPrime = 0; }, not after the second if block. –  Josh Caswell Sep 3 '12 at 0:50
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

He understands for loops. None of you understand his question. The fact is, this loop does not correctly determine prime numbers at all. For instance, it prints out 15 as well as 49 as being prime, when they are not. Because it does printing in the inner loop it also prints out prime numbers multiple times. It SHOULD be printing out 15, and your logic is sound. I don't know why it's not for you, but it is for me, as anyone with half a brain who follows the code can see. The correct implementation should be:

- (int)someMethod
{
        int isPrime;
        for (int p = 2; p <= 50; ++p) {
            isPrime = 1;

            for (int d = 2; d < p; ++d) {

                if ( p % d == 0)
                    isPrime = 0;
            }
            if (isPrime)
                NSLog (@"%i ", p);
        }

    return 0;
}

I see this is tagged as homework. Was the code you posted SUPPOSED to be faulty? I'll explain why it doesn't work.

See, to determine if a number is prime or not, this program should see if any number divides evenly into p. As soon as it finds one that does, the number is no longer prime, and it should set isPrime to 0. Once it's checked every number less than p, and thus determined isPrime, it should check isPrime to see whether or not it should print the number out. However, it instead checks isPrime every time it checks to see if a number divides evenly into p. Since isPrime is set to 1 at the start for every value of p, any number not divisible by 2 gets printed out. It checks to see if 2 evenly divides, it doesn't, it immediately checks isPrime which is 1, and immediately prints it out, as if it's prime; but what if a number AFTER 2 divides evenly into that number? This is why 15 and 49 are printed as prime numbers, when they are composite.

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You understood my question exactly. I took this problem straight out of Learning Objective-C by Stephen Kochan and I believe I copied it correctly(not sure how to view my original-unedited post), it is not meant to contain errors and since it's an example, I never even bothered to actually run the program. I should have realized something was wrong though as the number of braces is incorrect, which caused the error. Thanks a lot! –  Ronald Sep 3 '12 at 22:11
    
You're welcome. If my answer has been helpful to you, please consider marking my answer as accepted by clicking the checkmark below the upvote/downvote arrow buttons to your left. That way, others know the problem has been solved and your acceptance rate will remain high, which makes others more likely to help you in the future. –  Metabble Sep 4 '12 at 16:45
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I don't get what is unclear to you.

Problem: find if p is prime.

p is prime if it doesn't have any factor d <= p such that p%d == 0 with the exception of 1 and p itself. The inner for must loop through all the numbers lesser than p to make sure that noone of them is a factor of p.

Mind that this implementation is the trivial one and it's inefficient, it does what the implicit definition of a prime number is.

The only thing that may confuse you is the fact that the inner loop is not interrupted when a factor is found, eg.

if ( p % d == 0)
{
  isPrime = 0;
  NSLog("number is not prime!);
  break;
}
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If the value of 15 is put in for p, then when we get to the first if statement, the remainder of 15%2 is NOT equal to 0 so we will skip that if statement and go to the next if statement and the value of isPrime will be NOT be equal to 0, prompting the NSLog to display, so why is 15 not displayed? –  Ronald Sep 3 '12 at 1:21
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"My question is, why is that the first "for" statement proceeds immediately after incrementing by "1" whereas in the 2nd "for" statement, the loop proceeds until the value of d is no longer less than p before moving on to the final "if" statement and NSLog."

It seems like you are little confused on how a for loop works.

// Outer loop will run 1 time
for (int i = 0; i < 1; i++) {
    NSLog(@"Outer loop = %d", i);

    // Innter loop will run 10 times
    for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
        NSLog(@"Inner loop = %d", j);
    }
}

The loop above prints out the following output:

Outer loop = 0
Inner loop = 0
Inner loop = 1
Inner loop = 2
Inner loop = 3
Inner loop = 4
Inner loop = 5
Inner loop = 6
Inner loop = 7
Inner loop = 8
Inner loop = 9

Edit:

- (int)isPrime
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        // Outer loop will run once to check if 15 is prime
        for (int p = 15; p <= 15; ++p) {

            // You set isPrime to 1
            int isPrime = 1;

            // Inner loop will start at 2 and run until 14, there is no
            // need to check if 15 % 1 or 15 % 15 because a prime number is
            // divisible by itself or 1
            for (int d = 2; d < p; ++d) {

                NSLog(@"%d mod %d", p, d);

                // The first run through of the inner loop, you check if
                // 15 % 2, this is not true, so you skip to the next loop.
                if (p % d == 0) {
                    isPrime = 0;
                    //break;  // This is optional because at this point, you know p is not prime
                }

                // Remember you set isPrime to 1, so the loop checks if isPrime != 0
                // This statement is true, so you print p which at this point is 15.
                if (isPrime != 0) {
                    NSLog (@"%i ", p);
                }

                // On the next run through of the inner loop, 15 % 3 is equal to
                // 0, so you set isPrime to 0, and for the rest of the inner loop
                // isPrime is equal to 0, it can not change, this is why p is never
                // printed out again
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

I added a log statement in the inner loop. Go ahead and run my code, so you can see what is going on. I will say this, your code seems fine. You know if p is prime if isPrime is equal to 0, so adding a break statement would be a good idea. Check the code to see where you would place it.

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I think I don't understand how for statements work. If the value of 15 is put in for p, then when we get to the first if statement, the remainder of 15%2 is NOT equal to 0 so we will skip that if statement and go to the next if statement and the value of isPrime will be NOT be equal to 0, prompting the NSLog to display, so why is 15 not displayed? –  Ronald Sep 3 '12 at 1:19
    
@Ronald Check the edit, also I added a link, maybe that will help you –  Vikings Sep 3 '12 at 1:49
    
Thanks for the edit and link, it's your "probably" statement that I still don't understand, I understand what must be happening just not how it's actually happening. It's not clear why, when the first if statement establishes that 15%2 is not equal to 0, the value 15 does not move on to the second if statement, thereby displaying the value 15. This program would make perfect sense with a break statement. I think I must be forgetting something about how if statements work/proceed, I guess I'll sleep on it an re-read that chapter of the book I'm reading tomorrow. Thank you again for your help! –  Ronald Sep 3 '12 at 3:01
    
@Ronald I edited my answer, this should help you out! –  Vikings Sep 3 '12 at 14:27
    
My book is for some reason missing a brace, I completely understand everything now, thanks for your help! –  Ronald Sep 3 '12 at 22:17
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