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I'm trying to pass a void* to a function, then inside that function make the pointer point to an dynamically created object. This is what I have so far but it doesn't seem to be working:

main:

int main()
{
  void* objPtr;

  setPtr(objPtr);
}

setPtr:

void setPtr(void*& objPtr)
{
  objPtr = new Obj1; 
  (*objPtr).member1 = 10; //error: expression must have pointer-to-class type
}

Obj1:

struct Obj1
{
  int member1;
};

Thanks in advance

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3  
"Doesn't seem to be working" will not cut it. What unexpected behavior do you see, or what compiler error are you getting? You probably need parentheses in new Obj1() but I bet there are other problems too. –  David Grayson Sep 3 '12 at 1:17
    
when I try to assign a (public) member variable a value, it says that the expression must have pointer-to-class type –  Logan Besecker Sep 3 '12 at 1:22
1  
@LoganBesecker That problem is unrelated to the code given above. You'll need to show the code that defines the class and its members. –  jogojapan Sep 3 '12 at 1:23
    
Is there a reason why you pass the pointer as void * instead of Obj1 *? –  jogojapan Sep 3 '12 at 1:29
    
@jogojapan I have an array of void* so I can have different indexes of the array pointing to different object types –  Logan Besecker Sep 3 '12 at 1:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, sure: a void* doesn't point to a class type, so can't be used to access members. C++ is statically typed. The compiler sees a void* and that's that. It won't try to figure out what type of object the pointer actually points to -- you have to tell it, with a cast:

objPtr->whatever; // fails: objPtr is not a pointer-to-class-type

((actual_type*)objPtr)->whatever; // okay: cast to actual_type*

Well, that's the C programmer in me. Some folks prefer to use static_cast here:

static_cast<actual_type*>(objPtr)->whatever; // okay: cast to actual_type*

However you do it, though, you have to be sure that objPtr in fact points to an object of type actual_type.

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I didn't see the "(objPtr*).member1 = 10;" part when I started to write my answer –  Seçkin Savaşçı Sep 3 '12 at 1:31
    
oh, earlier I was trying (actual_type*)objPtr->whatever but didn't have the parentheses around the whole outer pair of parentheses –  Logan Besecker Sep 3 '12 at 1:31
3  
@LoganBesecker - (actual_type*)objPtr->whatever says to pretend that the type of objPtr->whatever is actual_type*. It's an easy mistake to make when you're first getting into this stuff. –  Pete Becker Sep 3 '12 at 1:33
    
Thank you Pete! I do have one more question though, which is a little off topic. Is there any difference between the C and C++ way of typecasting? I was initially taught the C style but now I'm wondering if there are any subtle(or not so subtle) differences between how the two work. –  Logan Besecker Sep 3 '12 at 1:43
1  
@Logan: The C++ casts are stricter than C casts. You can't use static_cast to remove a const qualifier (you need to use const_cast for that), among other restrictions. C-style casts are catchall that can perform all of the functions of the different C++ casts. It's also much easier to search a code base for instances of keywords like static_cast than for (typename), although honestly I've never seen anyone actually do that. One downside of C++ casts is that they require more typing. –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 3 '12 at 1:47

EDIT: The problem of the question owner turns out to be different, this answer stands for the same thing with implemented with pointer to pointers. Consult the real answer of Pete Becker about proper casting.

int main()
{
  void* objPtr;

  setPtr(&objPtr);
}

setPtr:

void setPtr(void** objPtr)
{
  *objPtr = new Obj1; //where Obj1 is user defined class type
}

What I do here is just C-way pointer passing, setPtr function takes a pointer to a void pointer, and sets the void pointer as intended.

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Did you mean to declare the function as setPtr(void ** objPtr)? –  jogojapan Sep 3 '12 at 1:20
    
Won't compile: can't dereference a void*. –  Pete Becker Sep 3 '12 at 1:20
    
@jogojapan thanks for pointing that out. I will update now. –  Seçkin Savaşçı Sep 3 '12 at 1:23
1  
Perhaps you could supply more of an explanation of the code? –  John Saunders Sep 3 '12 at 1:25
2  
@JohnSaunders - the code, now, is essentially the same as the original code, except that the address to be modified is passed with a pointer instead of a reference. This doesn't affect the actual problem. –  Pete Becker Sep 3 '12 at 1:26

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