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i want to count every word's occurrence in a file but the result is wrong.

#!/bin/bash
#usage: count.sh file

declare -a dict

for word in $(cat $1)
do
    if [ ${dict[$word]} == "" ] ;then
        dict[$word]=0
    else
        dict[$word]=$[${dict[$word]} + 1]
    fi
done

for word in ${!dict[@]}
do
    echo $word: ${dict[$word]}
done

use the test file below:

learning the bash shell
this is second line
this is the last line

bash -x count.sh file get the result:

+ declare -a dict
++ cat book
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' '' == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=0
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 0 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=1
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 1 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=2
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 2 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=3
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 3 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=4
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 4 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=5
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 5 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=6
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 6 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=7
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 7 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=8
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 8 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=9
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 9 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=10
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 10 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=11
+ for word in '$(cat $1)'
+ '[' 11 == '' ']'
+ dict[$word]=12
+ for word in '${!dict[@]}'
+ echo 0: 12 0: 12
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  Steve Sep 3 '12 at 3:14
    
@steve no, i am learning bash myself. i just want to solve this problem with bash –  bopie Sep 3 '12 at 3:25
    
A good idea using the debug trace, now look at what your debug trace is showing you. Why is it increasing the value to the right of dict[$word]= by 1 for each word that it is reading? That's not what you want, is it? Also your debug loop at the end is a good idea, but again the output is showing you that your variable naming/assignment/dereferencing is working as your expect. Good luck. –  shellter Sep 3 '12 at 3:52
    
ok, I admire your attempt. Note that $[ .... ] isn't doing what you expect AND that you can reduce your code for increment process to (( dict[$word]++ )) ( I think this works in bash, I know for certain it works in ksh). And.. finally, the old-school unix solution for word counts in files i sort file file2 ... | uniq -c. Good luck. –  shellter Sep 3 '12 at 3:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using declare -a dict means that each key is being evaluated to a numeric value, which is then used as an index. That's not what you want, if you're storing things by words. Use declare -A instead.


Also, $[ ] is an exceedingly outdated syntax for math. Even modern POSIX sh supports $(( )), which you should use instead:

dict[$word]=$(( ${dict[$word]} + 1 ))

or, to take advantage of bash-only math syntax:

(( dict[$word]++ ))

Also, using for word in $(cat $1) is broken in several ways:

  • It doesn't quote $1, so for a filename with spaces, it will split the name into several words and try to open each word as a separate file. To fix only this, you would use $(cat "$1") or $(<"$1") (which is more efficient, as it doesn't require starting the external program cat).
  • It tries to expand the words in the file as globs -- if the file contains *, every file in the current directory will be treated as a word.

Instead, use a while loop:

while read -r -d' ' word; do
  if [[ -n ${dict[$word]} ]] ; then
    dict[$word]=$(( ${dict[$word]} + 1 ))
  else
    dict[$word]=1
  fi
done <"$1"
share|improve this answer
    
it works. the main problem is "declare -A dict". and i learn much from your answer. thank you very much. –  bopie Sep 3 '12 at 5:01
    
@4E5043 If this is helpful to you, please mark it accepted. –  Charles Duffy Sep 3 '12 at 5:18
    
Although $((...)) (arithmetic expansion) is POSIX, the compound command ((...)) is not. –  chepner Sep 3 '12 at 12:54
    
@chepner Thanks; updated. –  Charles Duffy Sep 3 '12 at 13:43

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