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The goal of the shortest common superstring problem is to find the shortest possible string that contains every string in a given set as substrings. I understand that the problem is "NP complete". But there are approximation strategies for the problem. Given short strings for example

ABRAC
ACADA
ADABR
DABRA
RACAD

How to implement the shortest common superstring problem such that the output for the given strings above is ABRACADABRA? Another example

Given

fegiach
bfgiak
hfdegi
iakhfd
fgiakhg

the string bfgiakhfdegiach is a possible solution of length 15.

I would like to implement this in Ruby although I do not have an in depth study of algorithms, though am working to improve that.

A naive greedy implementation would involve creating a suffix array for each substring

def suffix_tree(string)
  size = string.length
  suffixes = Array.new(size)
  size.times do |i|
    suffixes[i] = string.slice(i, size)
  end
  suffixes
end

#store the suffixes in a hash
#key is a fragment, value = suffixes
def hash_of_suffixes(fragments)
  suffixes_hash = Hash.new
  fragments.each do |frag|
    suffixes_hash["#{frag}"]= suffix_tree(frag)
  end
  suffixes_hash
end


fragments = ['ABRAC','ACADA','ADABR','DABRA','RACAD']
h = hash_of_suffixes(fragments)

#then search each fragment in all the suffix trees and return the number of 
#overlaps for each key

#store the results in graph??
#find possible ordering of the fragments

I would be grateful with some help.
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1  
What have you tried? –  Matt Ball Sep 3 '12 at 4:18
    
Maybe genitic algorithm? –  sawa Sep 3 '12 at 4:23
    
Both of your examples are wrong, shortest superstring for ['ABRAC', 'ACADA', 'ADABR', 'DABRA', 'RACAD'] is either "RACADABRAC" or "ADABRACADA". And "fegiach", and "fgiakhg" are not even in the string "bfgiakhfdegiach". –  Joshua Cheek Sep 3 '12 at 6:11
    
Thanks for that. I may have been quick in this but you get my idea.. the shortest string that includes all the substrings. –  eastafri Sep 3 '12 at 6:42

1 Answer 1

Please note the comment pointing out the problems with your examples. Also note that if there is some slick way to do this, I don't know what it is. I just iterate over all the permutations, smoosh them together, and find the shortest.

class ShortestSuperstring
  def initialize(*strings)
    self.strings = strings
  end

  def call
    @result ||= smoosh_many strings.permutation.min_by { |permutation| smoosh_many(permutation.dup).size }
  end

  private

  attr_accessor :strings

  def smoosh_many(permutation, current_word='')
    return current_word if permutation.empty?
    next_word = permutation.shift
    smoosh_many permutation, smoosh_two(current_word, next_word)
  end

  def smoosh_two(base, addition)
    return base if base.include? addition
    max_offset(base, addition).downto 0 do |offset|
      return base << addition[offset..-1] if addition.start_with? base[-offset, offset]
    end
  end

  def max_offset(string1, string2)
    min string1.size, string2.size
  end

  def min(n1, n2)
    n1 < n2 ? n1 : n2
  end
end

And test suite:

describe ShortestSuperstring do
  def self.ss(*strings, possible_results)
    example "#{strings.inspect} can come from superstrings #{possible_results.inspect}" do
      result = described_class.new(*strings).call
      strings.each { |string| result.should include string }
      possible_results.should include(result), "#{result.inspect} was not an expected superstring."
    end
  end

  ss '', ['']
  ss "a", "a", "a", ['a']
  ss "a", "b", %w[ab ba]
  ss 'ab', 'bc', ['abc']
  ss 'bc', 'ab', ['abc']
  ss 'abcd', 'ab', ['abcd']
  ss 'abcd', 'bc', ['abcd']
  ss 'abcd', 'cd', ['abcd']
  ss 'abcd', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', ['abcd']
  ss 'abcd', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'ab', 'cd', 'bcd', ['abcd']

  %w[ABRAC ACADA ADABR DABRA RACAD].permutation.each do |permutation|
    ss *permutation, %w[RACADABRAC ADABRACADA]
  end

  %w[fegiach bfgiak hfdegi iakhfd fgiakhg].permutation.each do |permutation|
    ss *permutation, %w[bfgiakhgiakhfdegifegiach
                        bfgiakhgfegiachiakhfdegi
                        iakhfdegibfgiakhgfegiach
                        iakhfdegibfgiakhgfegiach
                        fegiachiakhfdegibfgiakhg
                        fegiachbfgiakhgiakhfdegi
                        iakhfdegifegiachbfgiakhg]
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for sharing that approach! –  eastafri Sep 3 '12 at 7:03

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