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I have a collection which has elements to be processed and at max only four elements can be processed together. At run time all process started together and all goes in waiting state. Only four elements are processed at one time.

Problem is the processing elements are chosen randomly as all threads are waiting for resources to get free. Means first element can be the last one from collection.

But, I need to process elements in order they are in the collection.

Please tell me how can I achieve this?

I am using TPL and C# 4.0

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1  
Parallel.ForEach? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460720.aspx –  Romoku Sep 3 '12 at 4:36
    
Do you need to process them in order, or do you just need the result of the processing to be in order? If you need to process them in order you have side effects in your calculations and that is scary when you have parallel processing. –  Albin Sunnanbo Sep 3 '12 at 4:36
    
I need to process them in order. All processes are independent so there should not be any side effects. –  D J Sep 3 '12 at 4:43
2  
Do you know about the ParallelEnumerable.AsOrdered method? –  codesparkle Sep 3 '12 at 4:49
    
I studied on this. But here the problem is I just iterate the collection and start processing each element. Every element takes care of its process. –  D J Sep 3 '12 at 6:01

3 Answers 3

With parallelism there is always a problem of defining what "in order" means. Let's say you have a collection of 100 items. Processing them "in order 4 at a time" (as you requested) could mean:

  1. Loose ordering: use 4 threads and issue tasks in the order of the original collection.

    In this case you can use:

    ParallelOptions po = new ParallelOptions() { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 4 };
    Parallel.ForEach(list.AsParallel().AsOrdered(), po,
             (item) =>
             {
                 // code
             });
    

    In case of unbalanced tasks this will quickly lose the original ordering, as some threads may lag behind on heavy tasks, but the tasks will be allocated in order.

  2. Strict ordering: process them in order in groups of 4 like below:

                   0 1 2 3                
                   4 tasks
         _____________________________
                    barrier
    
                   4 5 6 7                
                   4 tasks
         _____________________________
                    barrier
    
                     etc.
    

    In this case you can employ a barrier:

    Barrier b = new Barrier(4);
    ParallelOptions po = new ParallelOptions() { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 4 };
    Parallel.ForEach(list.AsParallel().AsOrdered(), po,
        (item) =>
        {
            // code
            b.SignalAndWait();
        });
    

    Although you have to make sure that the number of tasks is a multiple of 4, otherwise the barrier won't be signaled at the last iterations.

  3. Process 4 items in a single task: you can create a task object that encapsulates 4 items of the original list and then do a simple Parallel.ForEach like in the first case (i.e. each thread will process 4 items sequentially as a part of a single task). This would issue tasks in groups of 4 in order, but again may cause some threads to lag behind if a task takes too long.

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:- Great explanations and ideas. Thanks. We also need to handle that if a process "say 1" is finished then we should start the fifth immediately. We cant wait for all the four processes to be finished. Let me try the approaches you suggested. –  D J Sep 3 '12 at 7:18
    
AFAIK Parallel.ForEach() doesn't understand ParallelQuery, so Parallel.ForEach(list.AsParallel().AsOrdered(), …) should be exactly the same as Parallel.ForEach(list, …). –  svick Sep 3 '12 at 8:58
    
Also, I think method #2 is not a good idea, because Parallel.ForEach() doesn't guarantee that it will use MaxDegreeOfParallelism threads. That's why it's MaxDegreeOfParallelism and not just DegreeOfParallelism. –  svick Sep 3 '12 at 9:01
    
@svick: I've tested the code on my system and AsOrdered works as expected. I've run several tests so I don't think it got the order right by accident. –  Tudor Sep 3 '12 at 9:06
    
@svick: As for the parallelism degree I agree with what you're saying, but I assumed he wants to limit the number of concurrent tasks to 4 at a time if he has say 8 cores. Of course you can't run 4 threads simultaneously on a dual-core. –  Tudor Sep 3 '12 at 9:07

It's unclear to me what exactly are you doing where “elements are chosen randomly”. But if you use Paralle.ForEach(), then it tries to be efficient and so it partitions the input sequence in some way. If the input sequence is an IList<T>, it will use range partitioning, otherwise, it will use chunk partitioning (see Chunk partitioning vs range partitioning in PLINQ).

If you want to process the items in order, you could configure Parallel.ForEach() by using a custom partitioner, which would partition the collection into chunks of size 1.

But since you don't really need Parallel.ForEach() here, possibly a simpler solution would be just to create 4 tasks that process the items one by one. For synchronization, you could use BlockingCollection. Something like:

public static class ParallelOrdered
{
    public static void ForEach<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection, Action<T> action, int degreeOfParallelism)
    {
        var blockingCollection = new BlockingCollection<T>();
        foreach (var item in collection)
            blockingCollection.Add(item);
        blockingCollection.CompleteAdding();

        var tasks = new Task[degreeOfParallelism];
        for (int i = 0; i < degreeOfParallelism; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(
                () =>
                {
                    foreach (var item in blockingCollection.GetConsumingEnumerable())
                        action(item);
                });
        }
        Task.WaitAll(tasks);
    }
}
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trying this solution... –  D J Sep 6 '12 at 10:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is how I acheived this task

public delegate void ProcessFinished(IParallelProcess process);
public interface IParallelProcess
{
    void Start();
    event ProcessFinished ProcessFinished;
}

public class ParallelProcessBasket : ConcurrentQueue<IParallelProcess>
{
    public void Put(IParallelProcess process)
    {
        base.Enqueue(process);
    }
    public IParallelProcess Get()
    {
        IParallelProcess process = null;
        base.TryDequeue(out process);
        return process;
    }
}
public class ParallelProcessor<T> where T : class
{
    private ParallelProcessBasket basket;
    private readonly int MAX_DEGREE_OF_PARALLELISM;
    private Action<T> action;
    public ParallelProcessor(int degreeOfParallelism, IEnumerable<IParallelProcess> processes, Action<T> action)
    {
        basket = new ParallelProcessBasket();
        this.action = action;
        processes.ToList().ForEach(
            (p) =>
            {
                basket.Enqueue(p);
                p.ProcessFinished += new ProcessFinished(p_ProcessFinished);
            });
        MAX_DEGREE_OF_PARALLELISM = degreeOfParallelism;
    }

    private void p_ProcessFinished(IParallelProcess process)
    {
        if (!basket.IsEmpty)
        {
            T element = basket.Get() as T;
            if (element != null)
            {
                Task.Factory.StartNew(() => action(element));
            }
        }
    }


    public void StartProcessing()
    {
        // take first level of iteration
        for (int cnt = 0; cnt < MAX_DEGREE_OF_PARALLELISM; cnt++)
        {
            if (!basket.IsEmpty)
            {
                T element = basket.Get() as T;
                if (element != null)
                {
                    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => action(element));
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
static void Main(string[] args)    
{
     ParallelProcessor<ParallelTask> pr = new ParallelProcessor<ParallelTask>(Environment.ProcessorCount, collection, (e) => e.Method1());
            pr.StartProcessing();
}

Thanks..

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