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I'm new in VB.NET, but for C, C++, C# and other languages I had some years of expericences. This problem for me is very weird because I never met it before.

I have this line of code:

If obj is Nothing Or obj.IsDisposed Then
'do some stuffs
End If

This line of code will reveal an error when obj is Nothing because obj.IsDisposed doesn't exist (no handle for it). As what I know, the first statement of Or it returns True so the result of If statement in anycase would be True.

Can anyone give me an instruction how to get rid of this (or I have to write If..Then..Else If..End If)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try OrElse, the obj.Disposed will not be evaluated when "obj is Nothing" is true

If obj is Nothing OrElse obj.IsDisposed Then
'do some stuffs
End If
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Many thanks. It works perfectly! –  Quang Yen Sep 3 '12 at 5:45

You can use the OrElse Operator it will bypass the second evaluation if the first is true.

From above Link:

A logical operation is said to be short-circuiting if the compiled code can bypass the evaluation of one expression depending on the result of another expression. If the result of the first expression evaluated determines the final result of the operation, there is no need to evaluate the second expression, because it cannot change the final result. Short-circuiting can improve performance if the bypassed expression is complex, or if it involves procedure calls.

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OrElse is what you need. it will only evaluate on the first evaluation as long as it is already true

If obj is Nothing OrElse obj.IsDisposed Then
    'do some stuffs
End If
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