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I am trying to get javascript chaining to work using variable substitution. Not able to get it work. Help appreciated.

var Class = function() {

 this.one = function() {
   alert('one');        
   return this;
 }

 this.two = function() {
   alert('two');
   return this;
 }

 if (this instanceof Class) {
    return this.Class;
 } else {
    return new Class();
 }

}

var test = new Class();
// this works
test.one().two();

var func = '.one().two()';
// want to make this work
test[func];
share|improve this question
1  
Calling functions based on their names in strings is considered to be a bad practice. Chained names in a string - bad practice x2. It really makes this code support painful and expensive. – zerkms Sep 3 '12 at 5:38
    
Thank you for the suggestion. I am using Node.Js validation library which is promoting function chaining. I want the chaining to be dynamic based on certain parameters. Above example is just illustrative on what i want to achieve. – Me Unagi Sep 3 '12 at 5:44
    
@MeUnagi - How are other plugins (?) or sample codes handle the same problem? For example, In Asp.net MVC validation these is clear mapping between string and functions, and the mechanism you describe here is done automatically (including arguments) – Kobi Sep 3 '12 at 6:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Highly not recommended. You might want to try an array instead:

var funcs = ['one','two'];
for(var i = 0; i < funcs.length; i++) {
  test[funcs[i]]();
}

you can then wrap this into a little function:

function callChain(obj, funcs)
{
  for(var i = 0; i < funcs.length; i++) {
    obj[funcs[i]]();
  }
  return obj;
}

Edit: If your chain is stored as a string: .one().two(), you can use the split & string functions to generate the array dynamically.

share|improve this answer

there is no function with the name '.one().two()'

Try this,

test['one']()['two']();

Edit: I believe you are using this for learning purpose only and not on production site.

share|improve this answer
    
this is not really dynamic. – Ben Rowe Sep 3 '12 at 5:44
    
I agree, Me Unagi wanted changes to existing code to make it working. – Sandeep G B Sep 3 '12 at 5:46
1  
"I am trying to get javascript chaining to work using variable substitution.". In this case, variable = dynamic. This is hard coded. – Ben Rowe Sep 3 '12 at 5:48
    
Thank you for lightning reply. Sorry for not being very clear on what I am looking for. Function chain string gets dynamically constructed based on certain conditions. Each condition adds function to chaining string. The function chain could be be either 'one().two()' or 'one().two().three()'. – Me Unagi Sep 3 '12 at 5:49

Well, what you are asking for is far from best practice - so I will give you an unpopular answer - use eval.
If your input is general code as string, you don't really have any other option (specifically when your functions have parameters - .one(1 + 0.5).two(new Date())).

For example, to your Class, add:

this.excecute = function(commands){
    eval('this' + commands);
};

And then:

test.excecute('.one().two(4 * 5)');

Working example: http://jsbin.com/ipazaz/1/edit

This emits the warning "eval is evil" (jslint, I think) - but I do not believe functions can be evil.

Even worse, what if you had the string 'one(); two(4 * 5);'?
You can make that work as well, using with:

this.excecute = function(commands){
    with(this){
        eval(commands);
    }
}; 

This has an extra warning: "Don't use 'with'" - They really have something against us today, don't they?

Working example: http://jsbin.com/ipazaz/2/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Please, everyone, before the downvotes - The assumption here is that we might have code as arguments to the functions, and not just the string "one one two one". – Kobi Sep 3 '12 at 6:06

Thank you all for prompt help. I ended up settling upon Ben Rowe suggestion.

var funcs = ['one','two'];
   for(var i = 0; i < funcs.length; i++) {
   test[funcs[i]]();
}

It fitted my requirement nicely. Appreciate all for the help. You all are wonderful.

share|improve this answer

You could add a method to the constructor:

 this.chain = function chain(){
   if (arguments.length && /\./.test(arguments[0])) {
    return chain.apply(this,arguments[0].split('.'));
   }
   var methods = [].slice.call(arguments),
       method = methods.shift();
   if(this[method] instanceof Function){
    this[method].call(this);
   }
   if (methods.length){
    chain.apply(this,methods);
   }
   return this;
 }
 // now you could do something like:
 test.chain('one.two.one.two.two');

Or extend Object.prototype

Object.prototype.chain = function chain(){
   if (arguments.length && /\./.test(arguments[0])) {
    return chain.apply(this,arguments[0].split('.'));
   }
   var methods = [].slice.call(arguments),
       method = methods.shift();
   if(this[method] && this[method] instanceof Function){
    this[method].call(this);
   }
   if (methods.length){
    chain.apply(this,methods);
   }
   return this;
};
// usage
({one:function(){console.log('I am one');},
  two:function(){console.log('I am two');}})
 .chain('one.two.one.one.two.two.two.one.two');
share|improve this answer

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