Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This feels like a noob question, so if it's a dupe, please point me to the right location :)

I tried including a DLL written in C into a C++ program. It didn't work; gcc said

test.cpp: xxx: error: too many arguments to function.

Here's a minimal working example:

Wrapper for DLL functions:

/* myWrapper.h */

#ifndef _MYWRAPPER_H
#define _MYWRAPPER_H
#include <windows.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

extern  FARPROC   EXPORTED_functionNameP;

int GetDLLpointers();

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif

Implementation thereof:

/* myWrapper.c */
#include <windows.h>
#include "myHeader.h"

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

HINSTANCE drvsHANDLE;

extern  FARPROC   EXPORTED_functionNameP;

int GetDLLpointers()
{
    static int result;

    drvsHANDLE = LoadLibrary("myLibrary.dll");
    if (drvsHANDLE == NULL) return (result=0);

    EXPORTED_functionNameP = GetProcAddress(
        drvsHANDLE, "originalFunctionName");    
    if (EXPORTED_functionNameP == NULL) return (result = 0);

    return (result = 1);
}

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

Naturally, I haven't written these nor the library myself, and preferably, they should all stay untouched. I did however add the extern "C" lines.

Then, my main file:

// my Main
#include <windows.h>
#include "myHeader.h"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int arg = 1;
    EXPORTED_functionNameP(arg);

    return 0;
}

Build commands:

gcc -I. -c -o myHeader.o myHeader.c -L. -lmyLibrary
g++ -I. -o main.exe myMain.cpp myHeader.o -L. -lmyLibrary

It works fine if I rewrite my main.cpp into valid C and compile with gcc instead of g++.

I tried changing extern "C" into extern "C++" to no avail, I tried all permutations or gcc and g++ for the two build commands, nothing.

I know it's something to do with name mangling, but I thought gcc would take care of that when you include the extern "C" lines...Can someone please explain what I'm missing here?

In case it matters --

Windows XP Pro (will be Win7 later on)

(MinGW) gcc 4.6.2

share|improve this question
    
Never did any Windows DLL stuff, so I am just guessing here. But is there any chance that "functionName" in "EXPORTED_functionNameP" should be replaced with, well, the function name? – DevSolar Sep 3 '12 at 7:10
1  
@DevSolar No, I've paraphrased everything here of course...In the real-world version, the function names are correct. Besides, it all works when compiling with gcc instead of g++... – Rody Oldenhuis Sep 3 '12 at 7:12
1  
It makes no sense to write #ifdef __cplusplus in the C source file myWrapper.c -- you should use this #ifdef only in the header files since these can be included by C or C++ source files. – harper Sep 3 '12 at 11:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a difference between C and C++.

int (FAR WINAPI * FARPROC) () 

In C, the FARPROC declaration indicates a callback function that has an unspecified parameter list. In C++, however, the empty parameter list in the declaration indicates that a function has no parameters.

The MSDN page on CallWindowProc explains a bit more.

share|improve this answer
    
The FARPROC is used inside the extern "C" block; doesn't that render it into the C version? – Rody Oldenhuis Sep 3 '12 at 7:31
    
The typedef might not be, so it will then be seen as a C++ function anyway. At least that would explain the message about wrong number of parameters. – Bo Persson Sep 3 '12 at 7:46

After a quick Google search, it seems that FARPROC is defined as this:

typedef int (FAR WINAPI *FARPROC)();

That is, FARPROC is a function that returns an int and takes no arguments. So you can't use it for any other case.

Instead declare EXPORTED_functionNameP like this:

extern void (*EXPORTED_functionNameP)(int);

Now EXPORTED_functionNameP is a pointer to a function that takes an int argument and returns no value.

share|improve this answer
    
That's gonna be painful -- there's hundreds of functions in the wrapper...there really isn't another way? – Rody Oldenhuis Sep 3 '12 at 7:30
    
@RodyOldenhuis Unfortunately there is no other way. C++ needs the exact function specifications. The only way to go around it would be to use e.g. void * and then typecast those pointers every time you call the functions, which in the end probably will be even more work. – Joachim Pileborg Sep 3 '12 at 7:33
    
Blegh...OK, time to bite the bullet. Just for my understanding; what would be the better practice to write such wrappers? – Rody Oldenhuis Sep 3 '12 at 7:35

The FARPROC type is a function pointer for a function that takes no parameters. You should declare EXPORTED_functionNameP like so (replacing void with whatever the function really returns):

extern void (*EXPORTED_functionNameP)(int);

And initialize it like so (the returned value from GetProcAddress() pretty much always needs to be cast to the correct type):

EXPORTED_functionNameP = (void (*)(int)) GetProcAddress(drvsHANDLE, "originalFunctionName");    

A typedef for the funciton type might make things a bit more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, EXPORTED_functionNameP isn't the only function defined in the wrapper -- there's hundreds. You're saying I should adjust each and every one of them? – Rody Oldenhuis Sep 3 '12 at 7:26
    
@Rody: probably - it's the same idea as having a prototype in a header for each of the hundreds of public functions you might have. – Michael Burr Sep 3 '12 at 15:37

It is because of FARPROC is defined as:

int (FAR WINAPI * FARPROC) ()

So you can not pass any parameters to such function in C++. For fix it you should define EXPORTED_functionNameP as pointer to function with equal semantics as defined in DLL-library. For example:

typedef (void* EXPORTED_functionNameP)(int value);
EXPORTED_functionNameP ExportedFns;
...
ExportedFns = GetProcAddress(drvsHANDLE, "originalFunctionName");
share|improve this answer

FARPROC is defined as

typedef int (FAR WINAPI *FARPROC)();

When you pass an additional argument although the argument list of the prototype is empty you get the error.

You need a proper prototype definition for PORTED_functionNameP and cas the result from GetProcAddress to that type in your GetDLLPopinters functions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.