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Using the scenario in How to Embed a Collection of Forms, I would like to ensure that a Task always have at least 1 Tag. For my case however, the relationship of Task and Tag is 1:n rather than n:m.

I am particularly concerned on the scenario where all Tags are removed (I'd like to prevent this). How can I ensure that a Task form always have at least 1 Tag?

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Your question is not really clear. For what do you need a minimum number of forms? You should explain it much more. –  Stony Sep 3 '12 at 8:19
    
Hi @Stony, thanks for pointing that out. I basically have an entity that must have at least one other dependent entity. I wanted to avoid being too specific with my question but I hope the question is clearer now. –  Czar Pino Sep 3 '12 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

I would create a custom Validator which checks if the property where the relationshop is mapped to on entity level has some elements in the collection.

And the Validator fails:

   public function isValid($value, Constraint $constraint)
    {
        if (count($value) <1 ) {
            //also define a message for your custom validator
            $this->setMessage($constraint->message, array('%string%' => $value));
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

For instructions how to implement this custom validator: http://symfony.com/doc/current/cookbook/validation/custom_constraint.html

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Thanks @m0c, I'll check this out. A concrete example of how this would apply to the Task-Tag example in How to Embed a Collection of Forms would be better though as it would help future references to questions similar to this. And would be more convenient for me. :) –  Czar Pino Sep 3 '12 at 12:25

do u want to just validate upon posting, wheter or not there is atleast 1 tag,

or do u want the form to actually already have 1 empty tag in it upon loading ? (wich i assume bacause u say "how can I ensure that a Task form always have at least 1 Tag?")

if u need the second, just

$tag1 = new Tag();
$tag1->name = 'tag1';
$task->getTags()->add($tag1);

Before

$form = $this->createForm(new TaskType(), $task);

like the docs say..

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Hi Sam, thanks for your help I just realized how misleading my question is. I have, however, already done what you suggested. What I need is validation as m0c have brought up. Still, I appreciate the effort. –  Czar Pino Sep 4 '12 at 12:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As pointed out by m0c the solution was indeed to utilize a custom validation constraint. However, I found out that such a constraint validator already exists in Symfony2.1 so I took the liberty of porting it for 2.0 (since some interfaces apparently changed in 2.1).

Here are ported versions (for 2.0) of Bernhard Schussek's Count.php and CountValidator.php for counting collections (see https://github.com/symfony/Validator/tree/master/Constraints).

Count.php

namespace MyVendor\MyBundle\Validator\Constraints;

use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Exception\MissingOptionsException;

/**
 * @Annotation
 *
 * @api
 */
class Count extends Constraint
{
    public $minMessage = 'This collection should contain {{ limit }} elements or more.';
    public $maxMessage = 'This collection should contain {{ limit }} elements or less.';
    public $exactMessage = 'This collection should contain exactly {{ limit }} elements.';
    public $min;
    public $max;

    public function __construct($options = null)
    {
        if (null !== $options && !is_array($options)) {
            $options = array(
                'min' => $options,
                'max' => $options,
            );
        }

        parent::__construct($options);

        if (null === $this->min && null === $this->max) {
            throw new MissingOptionsException('Either option "min" or "max" must be given for constraint ' . __CLASS__, array('min', 'max'));
        }
    }
}

CountValidator.php

namespace MyVendor\MyBundle\Validator\Constraints;

use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\ConstraintValidator;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Exception\UnexpectedTypeException;

class CountValidator extends ConstraintValidator
{
    /**
     * {@inheritDoc}
     */
    public function isValid($value, Constraint $constraint)
    {
        if (null === $value) {
            return false;
        }

        if (!is_array($value) && !$value instanceof \Countable) {
            throw new UnexpectedTypeException($value, 'array or \Countable');
        }

        $count = count($value);

        if ($constraint->min == $constraint->max
                && $count != $constraint->min) {
            $this->setMessage($constraint->exactMessage, array(
                '{{ count }}' => $count,
                '{{ limit }}' => $constraint->min,
            ));

            return false;
        }

        if (null !== $constraint->max && $count > $constraint->max) {
            $this->setMessage($constraint->maxMessage, array(
                '{{ count }}' => $count,
                '{{ limit }}' => $constraint->min,
            ));

            return false;
        }

        if (null !== $constraint->min && $count < $constraint->min) {
            $this->setMessage($constraint->minMessage, array(
                '{{ count }}' => $count,
                '{{ limit }}' => $constraint->min,
            ));

            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }
}
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