Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If have the following:

public static void main() { 
    MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
    obj.Method1();
}
public class MyClass1() {
    public void Method1() {
        MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2();
        obj.Method1();
    }
}
public class MyClass2() {
   public void Method1() {
       MyClass3 obj = new MyClass3();
       obj.Method1();
   }
}
public class MyClass3() {
   public void Method1() {
       // Raise event here that is handled in MyClass1?    
   }
}

Can MyClass3.Method1() raise an event that is handled in MyClass1?

How would the event handling code be written if I wanted to acheive this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

Yes it can, but since each level doesn't know about the deeper levels of you chain, you would have to create events on each class. Some like this:

public static void main() { 
    MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
    obj.MyEvent += (s, e) => { Console.WriteLine("Fired!"); };
    obj.Method1();
}

public class MyClass1 {
    public void Method1() {
        MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2();
        obj.MyEvent += (s, e) => { OnMyEvent(); };
        obj.Method1();
    }
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;
    private void OnMyEvent() {
        var myEvent = MyEvent;
        if (myEvent != null)
            myEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
public class MyClass2 {
    public void Method1() {
        MyClass3 obj = new MyClass3();
        obj.MyEvent += (s, e) => { OnMyEvent(); };
        obj.Method1();
    }
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;
    private void OnMyEvent() {
        var myEvent = MyEvent;
        if (myEvent != null)
            myEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
public class MyClass3 {
    public void Method1() {
        // Raise event here that is handled in MyClass1?    
        OnMyEvent();
    }
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;
    private void OnMyEvent() {
        var myEvent = MyEvent;
        if (myEvent != null)
            myEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you have to chain the events back to MyClass1, so in fact MyClass1 cannot handle an event raised by MyClass3? –  Paul Lassiter Sep 3 '12 at 8:09
1  
Your problem is the fact that MyClass1 doesn't know the instance of MyClass3 which will raise the event, so it can't subscribe to the event. –  Francesco Baruchelli Sep 3 '12 at 8:16
    
@PaulLassiter - Francesco beat me to it. –  Maarten Sep 3 '12 at 8:21
    
It's much easier with the add/remove syntax. –  Chris Gessler Sep 3 '12 at 8:31
    
@ChrisGessler: do you agree with Philipp's answer that a callback type solution would be better? –  Paul Lassiter Sep 3 '12 at 8:52

Event handling ABCs assume that you have subscriber and publisher. So you might want your MyClass3 to have public event, while MyClass1 subscribes for this event.

However in your specific code this complexity does not make any sense - the easiest way just to use a callback function:

public static void main() { 
    MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
    obj.Method1();
}
public class MyClass1{
    public void Method1() {
        MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2();
        obj.Method1(MyEventHandler);
    }

    public void MyEventHandler() {
    //...
    }

}
public class MyClass2{
   public void Method1(Action callback) {
       MyClass3 obj = new MyClass3();
       obj.Method1(callback);
   }
}
public class MyClass3{
   public void Method1(Action callback) {
       // Raise event here that is handled in MyClass1?    
       callback();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is the Action type new? I am only using C# 2.0 . Could a delegate be used instead? –  Paul Lassiter Sep 3 '12 at 8:15
    
@PaulLassiter Action is just a delegate with no parameters and void return type. You can define something equivalent by yourself. –  Ral Zarek Sep 3 '12 at 9:15
    
public delegate void Action(); –  Philipp Munin Sep 3 '12 at 18:14

You can add the event to the intermediary class in order to connect things up. Something like this:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace Demo
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
            obj.Method1();
        }
    }

    public class MyClass1
    {
        public void Method1()
        {
            MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2();
            obj.SomethingHappened += somethingHappened;
            obj.Method1();
        }

        private static void somethingHappened(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Something happened!");
        }
    }

    public class MyClass2
    {
        public void Method1()
        {
            MyClass3 obj = new MyClass3();
            obj.SomethingHappened += onSomethingHappened;
            obj.Method1();
        }

        public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

        private void onSomethingHappened(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var handler = SomethingHappened;

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, e);
            }
        }
    }

    public class MyClass3
    {
        public void Method1()
        {
            onSomethingHappened();
        }

        private void onSomethingHappened()
        {
            var handler = SomethingHappened;

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, new EventArgs());
            }
        }

        public event EventHandler SomethingHappened;
    }
}

One thing you might want to consider is what you do with the "sender" argument in the intermediary class. You could make it MyClass2 (as in the code above) or you could keep the original sender like this:

private void onSomethingHappened(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var handler = SomethingHappened;

    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(sender, e);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to avoid the callback solution and the chain of events in every class, you have basically 2 solutions.

The first one consists of turning the local variables of type MyClassX into fields, i.e. something like Chris Gessler suggested, but completely following this approach and deleting the local vars.

public static void main() { 
    MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
    obj.c2.c3.SomeEvent += obj_SomeEvent;      
    obj.Method1();
}

private static void obj_SomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)             
{             
    Console.WriteLine("Some event fired");             
}

public class MyClass1() {
    public MyClass2 c2 = new MyClass2();

    public void Method1() {
        c2.Method1();
    }
}
public class MyClass2() {
   public MyClass3 c3 = new MyClass3();

   public void Method1() {
       c3.Method1();
   }
}
public class MyClass3() {
    public event EventHandler SomeEvent;

    private void OnSomeEvent() 
    { 
        if (SomeEvent!= null) 
        { 
            SomeEvent(this, new EventArgs()); 
        } 
    } 
   public void Method1() {
       OnSomeEvent();    
   }
}

Your other option (but it really depends on what you are trying to do if it is feasible, and I don't like anyway) is to simply define the event in MyClass3 as static:

public static void main() { 
    MyClass3.SomeEvent += obj_SomeEvent;
    MyClass1 obj = new MyClass1();
    obj.Method1();
}

private static void obj_SomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)             
{             
     Console.WriteLine("Some event fired");             
}

public class MyClass1() {
    public void Method1() {
        MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2();
        obj.Method1();
    }
}
public class MyClass2() {
   public void Method1() {
       MyClass3 obj = new MyClass3();
       obj.Method1();
   }
}
public class MyClass3() {
    public static event EventHandler SomeEvent;

    private void OnSomeEvent(MyClass3 anObj) 
    { 
        if (SomeEvent!= null) 
        { 
            SomeEvent(anObj, new EventArgs()); 
        } 
    }

    public void Method1() {
       OnSomeEvent(this);    
    }
}
share|improve this answer

To chain event handlers, use the add/remove syntax in MyClass2. From MyClass1, set SomeEvent and in MyClass3, raise it.

public class MyClass1             
{             
    MyClass2 obj = new MyClass2(); 

    public MyClass1()
    {
        obj.SomeEvent += obj_SomeEvent;
    }

    public void Method1()             
    {                      
        obj.Method1();             
    }             

    private static void obj_SomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)             
    {             
        Console.WriteLine("Some event fired");             
    }             
}  


public class MyClass2() 
{    
   MyClass3 cls3 = new MyClass3();

   public void Method1() 
   {     
       cls3.FireSomeEvent();    
   }   

    public event MyEventHandler SomeEvent
    { 
        add { this.cls3.SomeEvent += value; } 
        remove { this.cls3.SomeEvent -= value; } 
    }  
}

public class MyClass3() 
{
    public event EventHandler SomeEvent;

    private void OnSomeEvent() 
    { 
        if (SomeEvent!= null) 
        { 
            SomeEvent(this, new EventArgs()); 
        } 
    } 

    public void FireSomeEvent
    {
        OnSomeEvent();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Here you are someway "cheating" turning a local variable into a field (MyClass3 in MyClass2). Furthermore it doesn't work, because cls3 is null when you subscribe to SomeEvent of MyClass2. This means that you should instantiate MyClass3 outside Method1 of MyClass2, but I don't think this is something the OP could like. –  Francesco Baruchelli Sep 3 '12 at 20:54
    
@FrancescoBaruchelli - thanks for pointing out the bug. –  Chris Gessler Sep 4 '12 at 10:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.