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Within a class, a field that has the same name as a field in the superclass hides the superclass's field. My english is poor , so just see the codes:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Father father = new Son();
        System.out.println(father.i); //why 1?
        System.out.println(father.getI());  //2
        System.out.println(father.j);  //why 10?
        System.out.println(father.getJ()); //why 10?

        System.out.println();

        Son son = new Son();
        System.out.println(son.i);  //2 
        System.out.println(son.getI()); //2
        System.out.println(son.j); //20
        System.out.println(son.getJ()); //why 10?
    }  
}

class Son extends Father {

    int i = 2;
    int j = 20;

    @Override
    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }
}

class Father {

    int i = 1;
    int j = 10;

    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }

    public int getJ() {
        return j;
    }
}

Can someone explain the results for me ...?

All replies are appreciated。

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closed as too localized by casperOne Sep 4 '12 at 12:20

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Based on your understanding what hiding and inheritance means; why do you think the values are the way they are? You should be able to work this out for yourself. – Peter Lawrey Sep 3 '12 at 8:53
1  
Oracle Tutorial on hiding variables. – alex Sep 3 '12 at 8:56
    
Is this homework? – Duncan Sep 3 '12 at 8:56
    
A son is not a type of father – jsj Sep 3 '12 at 9:13

In java, fields are not polymorphic.

Father father = new Son();
System.out.println(father.i); //why 1? Ans : reference is of type father, so 1 (fields are not polymorphic)
System.out.println(father.getI());  //2 : overridden method called
System.out.println(father.j);  //why 10? Ans : reference is of type father, so 2
System.out.println(father.getJ()); //why 10? there is not overridden getJ() method in Son class, so father.getJ() is called

System.out.println();

// same explaination as above for following 
Son son = new Son();
System.out.println(son.i);  //2 
System.out.println(son.getI()); //2
System.out.println(son.j); //20
System.out.println(son.getJ()); //why 10?
share|improve this answer
    
Just in java? any other language provide polymorphism on fields? – UnKnown Mar 25 at 18:59

Well a very good question! Let's look it in parts:

As per Overriding and Hiding Methods

The version of the hidden method that gets invoked depends on whether it is invoked from the superclass or the subclass.

i.e. when you invoke a method which is overridden in subclass via a super class reference the super class method is invoked and it access super class members.

This explains following as the reference used is of superclass:

System.out.println(father.i);  //why 1?
System.out.println(father.j);  //why 10?
System.out.println(father.getJ()); //why 10?

Similarly for the following:

System.out.println(son.getJ()); //why 10?

since getJ() is not defined in Son a Father version is invoked which sees member defined in the Father class.

If you read Hiding Fields; they specifically don't recommend such method of coding as

Generally speaking, we don't recommend hiding fields as it makes code difficult to read.

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