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I'm working on C++. Following is my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class base
{
        public:
        virtual void display(int a = 4)
        {
                cout << "base ::  "<<  a*a << endl;
        }
};

class derived : public base
{
        public:
        void display(int b = 5)
        {
                cout << " Derived :: " << b*b*b <<  endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
        base *bobj;
        derived dobj;
        bobj = &dobj;
        bobj->display();
        return 0;
}

The output is:

Derived :: 64

The function of Base class is called, but default value of the parameter of derived function is used. Why the derived class method display(), takes the base class method argument value?

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because you're calling it through a pointer to base. That's how it works.

Arguments are pushed on the argument stack (or inside registers) before the actual call. Because you have a pointer to base and no parameters, the default 4 is passed to the function. Then the correct function is called (derived::display), but with base's default parameter. Of course, this is an implementation detail, but the behavior is standard.

C++03 8.4/10

A virtual function call (10.3) uses the default arguments in the declaration of the virtual function determined by the static type of the pointer or reference denoting the object. An overriding function in a derived class does not acquire default arguments from the function it overrides.

I would provide emphasis on the quote, but the whole thing is pretty self-explanatory.

dobj.display();

would print 125 (5^3).

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Default arguments are inserted by the caller. Your code is equivalent to

class base {
public:
    virtual void display(int a) { cout << "base ::  "<<  a*a << endl; }
    inline void display(void) { display(4); }
};

etc.

When calling through a base pointer, the default value from the base class is inserted.

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I like this equivalent, however to understand what's going on one need to understand how hiding works. –  Matthieu M. Sep 3 '12 at 12:04
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The Standard says it all:

(§8.3.6/10) A virtual function call (10.3) uses the default arguments in the declaration of the virtual function determined by the static type of the pointer or reference denoting the object. An overriding function in a derived class does not acquire default arguments from the function it overrides. [ Example:

    struct A {
      virtual void f(int a = 7);
    };
    struct B : public A {
      void f(int a);
    };
    void m() {
      B* pb = new B;
      A* pa = pb;
      pa->f();   // OK, calls pa->B::f(7)
      pb->f();   // error: wrong number of arguments for B::f()
    }
    — end example ]
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Make yourself a less contrived test setup, and it becomes clear:

#include "base.hpp"

int compute(base * p)
{
    return p->display();
}

Two things are obvious now:

  1. The default argument can only possibly come from the default argument specified in base.

  2. The actual dispatch is dynamic, since display is a virtual member function.

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(1) isn't entirely obvious to me (I mean, I know it's true, but if I didn't know then I couldn't conclude it from your code). In some languages, default arguments aren't filled in until the callee is entered, and so virtual functions can have their defaults overridden as the questioner expected. C++ just isn't one of those languages. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '12 at 9:35
    
@SteveJessop: for 1: the code doesn't even know that any derived classes exist. Within the entire translation unit, there's no mention of any other default value than the one in base. That's what I meant by "obvious" (though of course it should be "obvious for C++"). Or in other words, "overload resolution happens statically". –  Kerrek SB Sep 3 '12 at 9:48
    
@KerrekSM: yep, that's why it's obvious to us, the key point being that the caller provides the value of the default. If you didn't know that fact about C++ then it wouldn't be obvious -- imagine a calling convention for a language other than C++, in which the caller calls the virtual function with a flag to say, "use the default value of this param". Then overload resolution could still happen statically, and the caller would know that there is a default but not need to know its value. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '12 at 11:36
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When you use -> i.e. invoke a function using a pointer it uses the object which is being pointed for taking a decision which in this case is an object of Derived class.

As the specification says...

A virtual function call uses the default arguments in the declaration of the virtual function determined by the static type of the pointer or reference denoting the object. An overriding function in a derived class does not acquire default arguments from the function it overrides.

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