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I want to cut my data using defined breaks in cut():

x = c(-10:10)

cut(x, c(-2,4,6,7))

[1] <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   <NA>   (-2,4] (-2,4] (-2,4] (-2,4] (-2,4] (-2,4] (4,6]  (4,6]  (6,7]  <NA>   <NA>  
[21] <NA>  
Levels: (-2,4] (4,6] (6,7]

However, I also want to obtain the levels (minimum:-2] and (7:maximum]. In the function recode() of the car-package one can use "lo:". Is there a similar thing available for cut?

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4 Answers 4

x <- -10:10

cut(x, c(-Inf, -2, 4, 6, 7, +Inf))

# Levels: (-Inf,-2] (-2,4] (4,6] (6,7] (7, Inf]
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you don't need the + in front of the positive Inf –  b70568b5 Sep 3 '12 at 9:34
1  
@ RJ: I know; it was only used for illustration purposes. –  Sven Hohenstein Sep 3 '12 at 9:40
    
Cool. Thanks a lot! –  paulburg Sep 3 '12 at 9:42

I've run into trouble padding with Inf & -Inf before (though exactly why escapes me at this hour) so a safer solution might be to pad with the minimum and maximum values suitably extended:

x <- c(-10:10)
cut(x, c(min(x) -1 , -2, 4, 6, 7, max(x) + 1))

R> x <- c(-10:10)
R> cut(x, c(min(x) -1 , -2, 4, 6, 7, max(x) + 1))
 [1] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2] (-11,-2]
 [9] (-11,-2] (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (4,6]   
[17] (4,6]    (6,7]    (7,11]   (7,11]   (7,11]  
Levels: (-11,-2] (-2,4] (4,6] (6,7] (7,11]

In most cases though, Sven's Answer/solution will suffice.

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findInterval is the answer.

i <- findInterval(x, c(-2,4,6,7))

cbind(x, i)

        x i
 [1,] -10 0
 [2,]  -9 0
 [3,]  -8 0
 [4,]  -7 0
 [5,]  -6 0
 [6,]  -5 0
 [7,]  -4 0
 [8,]  -3 0
 [9,]  -2 1
[10,]  -1 1
[11,]   0 1
[12,]   1 1
[13,]   2 1
[14,]   3 1
[15,]   4 2
[16,]   5 2
[17,]   6 3
[18,]   7 4
[19,]   8 4
[20,]   9 4
[21,]  10 4
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You can use min() and max() to evaluate the interval range (as Gavin mentioned) and set include.lowest = TRUE to make sure that the minimum value (here: -10) is part of the interval.

Input:

x = c(-10:10)

cut(x, c(min(x),-2,4,6,7,max(x)), include.lowest = TRUE)

Output:

 [1] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] [-10,-2] (-2,4]  
[11] (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (-2,4]   (4,6]    (4,6]    (6,7]    (7,10]   (7,10]  
[21] (7,10]  
Levels: [-10,-2] (-2,4] (4,6] (6,7] (7,10]
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