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I have two tables which both have a 'Name' column. The tables are not related to each other. I'd like to enforce uniqueness across these two columns.

I've been trying to create an indexed view out of the two columns but have found out that I cannot use a union all nor a full join to get the full list of names. I feel like I'm missing an obvious alternative which would allow me to add the unique index.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Assuming both of your base tables have a unique constraint on 'Name' then the only way uniqueness can be violated is if the same name is in both tables.

i.e. you expect a join against them to return zero rows. So you can cross join the result of that join against a table with 2 rows and create a unique index against that.

CREATE TABLE dbo.Two
  (
     N INT PRIMARY KEY
  )

INSERT INTO dbo.Two
VALUES      (1),
            (2)

GO

CREATE VIEW dbo.UniqueNames
WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
  SELECT T1.Name
  FROM   dbo.T1
         INNER JOIN dbo.T2
           ON T1.Name = T2.Name
         CROSS JOIN dbo.Two

GO

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX IX
  ON dbo.UniqueNames(Name) 
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this approach result in a clustered index rebuild for any change to the underlying tables? –  Andomar Sep 3 '12 at 12:03
    
@Andomar - rebuild of what? The view should always contain no rows except possibly temporarily if it is about to throw a constraint violation. The indexed view maintenance should only try and do the join for modified rows in the base tables. That is why there are all the restrictions on indexed views. –  Martin Smith Sep 3 '12 at 12:13
    
Thanks for the clarification. I didn't know indexed views were that smart. :) –  Andomar Sep 3 '12 at 12:45
    
interesting approach, thanks. –  dskh Sep 3 '12 at 13:03

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