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I have a program that listens to the console stdin stream.

  • When Read() returns, every character is read out one by one and passed to method().
  • method() then appends the character to a StringBuilder.
  • If the character is '\n' , then method() calls respond(), which prints out the read characters and clears the StringBuilder.

However, even after typing something in the console and pressing Enter, I have to press/move my mouse, the mouse buttons, or the keyboard within the focus of the console for the text typed to be echoed. Even more mysterious is that when I set a breakpoint in the first curly brace of Main() and step into every single statement thereafter, the program executes correctly. How can i fix this? Thanks a lot!

public class test
{
    static byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
    static Stream instrm = Console.OpenStandardInput();
    static Stream outstrm = Console.OpenStandardOutput();
    static System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
    static void Main()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            instrm.Read(buffer, 0, 1);
            method(buffer);
        }
    }
    public static void method(byte[] buffer)
    {
        sb.Append(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer));
        if (buffer[0] == (byte)10) respond();
    }
    public static void respond()
    {
        byte[] bytes = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(sb.ToString());
        outstrm.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
        outstrm.Flush();
        sb.Clear();
    }
}

EDIT:
I just tested and found out that it had nothing to do with the thread, so took the part away. I originally posted it so as it was a problem in my other program, this being only a test model to demonstrate it.

share|improve this question
1  
Is it intentional to let your Main method end ? –  Henk Holterman Sep 3 '12 at 11:49
    
Please add puctuation, capital letters and whitespace to your text so I can decipher it. –  Jodrell Sep 3 '12 at 11:49
    
@HenkHolterman does rather defeat the point of multi-threading. –  Jodrell Sep 3 '12 at 11:50
    
sorry, just tested it further, editing my question. –  namehere Sep 3 '12 at 11:51
    
@Jodrell How's that? –  Default Sep 3 '12 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would change the program like this:

static byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
static TextReader instrm = new StreamReader(Console.OpenStandardInput());
static TextWriter outstrm = new StreamWriter(Console.OpenStandardOutput());
static StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
static void Main()
{
  while (true)
  {
    var readLine = instrm.ReadLine();
    respond(readLine);
  }
}

public static void respond(string line)
{
  outstrm.Write(line);
  outstrm.Flush();
}

It is easier and works. The main difference is to use StreamReader and StreamWriter instead for Stream.

share|improve this answer
    
how could i have forgotten about those classes? thanks! still, i dont get whats wrong with my program. –  namehere Sep 3 '12 at 13:23
    
since the readline() ends with either "\r\n", "\n", or "\r", although it doesnt affect my program that much, i decided to try out streamreader's read(), and it works perfectly. so im certain the problem lies in MS's bad implementation of stream's read(). –  namehere Sep 3 '12 at 13:59

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