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I have the following text file that I am working with and must be able to parse only the object name value when the creationdatetime is older than two days.

objectname ...........................: \Path\to\file\hpvss-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-29Aug12 22.39.15
creationdatetime .....................: 01-Sep-2012 02:17:43
objectname ...........................: \Path\to\file\hpVSS-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-28Aug12 22.16.19
creationdatetime .....................: 03-Sep-2012 10:18:09
objectname ...........................: \Path\to\file\hpVSS-LUN-22May-12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-27Aug12 22.01.52
creationdatetime .....................: 03-Sep-2012 10:18:33

An output of the command for the above would be:

\Path\to\file\hpvss-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-29Aug12 22.39.15

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Prem

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2 Answers 2

Date parsing in awk is a bit tricky but it can be done using mktime. To convert the month name to numeric, an associative translation array is defined.

The path names have space in them so the best choice for field separator is probably : (colon followed by space). Here's a working awk script:

older_than_two_days.awk

BEGIN {
  months2num["Jan"] = 1;  months2num["Feb"] =  2; months2num["Mar"] =  3; months2num["Apr"] =  4;
  months2num["May"] = 5;  months2num["Jun"] =  6; months2num["Jul"] =  7; months2num["Aug"] =  8;
  months2num["Sep"] = 9;  months2num["Oct"] = 10; months2num["Nov"] = 11; months2num["Dec"] = 12;

  now = systime()
  two_days = 2 * 24 * 3600
  FS  = ": "
}

$1 ~ /objectname/ { 
  path = $2
}

$1 ~ /creationdatetime/ {
  split($2, ds, " ")
  split(ds[1], d, "-")
  split(ds[2], t, ":")
  date           = d[3] " " months2num[d[2]] " " d[1] " " t[1] " " t[2] " " t[3]
  age_in_seconds = mktime(date)

  if(now - age_in_seconds > two_days)
    print path
}

All the splitting in the last block is to pick out the date bits and convert them into a format that mktime accepts.

Run it like this:

awk -f older_than_two_days.awk infile

Output:

\Path\to\file\hpvss-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-29Aug12 22.39.15
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Many thanks Thor. It is exactly what I needed. –  Przemyslaw Ceglowski Sep 3 '12 at 13:32
    
If the answer solves your question satisfactorily, consider voting it up and accepting it. –  Thor Sep 3 '12 at 14:26

I would do it in 2 phases:

1) reformat you input file

awk '/objectname/{$1=$2="";file=$0;getline;$1=$2="";print $0" |"file}' inputfile > inputfile2

This way you would deal with

01-Sep-2012 02:17:43 |  \Path\to\file\hpvss-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-29Aug12 22.39.15
03-Sep-2012 10:18:09 |  \Path\to\file\hpVSS-LUN-22May12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-28Aug12 22.16.19
03-Sep-2012 10:18:33 |  \Path\to\file\hpVSS-LUN-22May-12 22.24.11\hpVSS-LUN-27Aug12 22.01.52

2) filter on dates:

COMPARDATE=$(($(date +%s)-2*24*3600)) # 2 days off
IFS='|'
while read d f
do 
  [[ $(date -d "$d" +%s) < $COMPARDATE ]] && printf "%s\n" "$f"
done < inputfile2
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Thanks Stephane! Is there any way to do the filtering in awk, as I am working in the windows environment using gawk? –  Przemyslaw Ceglowski Sep 3 '12 at 13:17
    
If you intend to do serious test processing I suggest you install cygwin cygwin.com on your Windows machine. This way you will be able to script almost as easily as on a Unix machine –  Stephane Rouberol Sep 3 '12 at 13:53

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