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I have an XML file with the following structure:

<root>
    <level1>
        <level2>
            <value>A</value>
            <value>B</value>
            <value>C</value>
            <value>D</value>
            <value>E</value>
            <value>F</value>
        </level2>
    </level1>
</root>

Guess I want to concatenate only the first three values in XSL in order to get ABC. How do I do it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming the focus item is the level2 node, you can use a XSLT 1.0 sequence constructor like...

<xsl:value-of select="concat(value[1],value[2],value[3])" />

...or in XSLT 2.0...

<xsl:value-of select="for $i in 1 to 3 return value[$i]" />
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I. Here is a general and powerful way to produce the concatenation of any values given their (increasing) positions:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pPositions" select="'|1|2|3|'"/>

 <xsl:template match="value">
     <xsl:if test="contains($pPositions, concat('|',position(),'|'))">
      <xsl:value-of select="."/>
     </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
    <level1>
        <level2>
            <value>A</value>
            <value>B</value>
            <value>C</value>
            <value>D</value>
            <value>E</value>
            <value>F</value>
        </level2>
    </level1>
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

ABC

Should we wish the concatenation of the 1st, 3rd and 6th value elements values, we just provide a corresponding $pPositions parameter:

 <xsl:param name="pPositions" select="'|1|3|6|'"/>

and the same, unchanged XSLT code now produces the wanted:

ACF

II. Things become more interesting if we have any (not necessarily increasing) sequence of positions:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pPositions">
  <p>4</p>
  <p>1</p>
  <p>3</p>
 </xsl:param>

 <xsl:variable name="vPositions" select=
      "document('')/*/xsl:param[@name='pPositions']"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="vDoc" select="."/>

  <xsl:for-each select="$vPositions/p">
    <xsl:value-of select="$vDoc/*/*/*/value[position()=current()]"/>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the same XML document (above) we get the wanted, correct result:

DAC

III. This is trivial in XSLT 2.0:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pPositions" as="xs:integer*" select="4,1,3"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:value-of separator="" select=
   "for $n in $pPositions
     return
        /*/*/*/value[$n]
   "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
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You can do this with one piece of XPath:

/root/level1/level2/value[position() &lt;= 3]/text()

To put that into an XSLT:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="text"/>

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:copy-of select="root/level1/level2/value[position() &lt;= 3]/text()" />
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
Suppose I want to store the string in a hidden field. How do I do that? –  RegedUser00x Sep 3 '12 at 12:43
    
Just put a <xsl:variable name="myVar">..</xsl:variable> round the <xsl:copy-of and you can then do whatever you need to with $myVar. –  Flynn1179 Sep 3 '12 at 12:49

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