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How can I insert a set of lines (about 5) into a file at the first place a string is found?

For example:

BestAnimals.txt

dog
cat
dolphin
cat

$ "Insert giraffe to BestAnimals.txt before cat" > NewBestAnimals.txt

NewBestAnimals.txt

dog
giraffe 
cat
dolphin
cat
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If using gnu sed:

$ cat animals
dog
cat
dolphin
cat

$ sed  "/cat/ { N; s/cat\n/giraffe\n&/ }" animals
dog
giraffe
cat
dolphin
cat
  1. match a line with (/cat/)
  2. continue on next line (N)
  3. substitute the matched pattern with the insertion and the matched string, where & represent the matched string.
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This works for GNU sed, but not BSD sed on Mac OS X. –  chepner Sep 3 '12 at 13:40
    
True, should have added that. Updated. –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 3 '12 at 13:41
    
there is a problem when there is a nyan cat line first, for instance –  bernard paulus Sep 4 '12 at 0:25
    
yes, but that wasn't part of the question ;-) Start small with the simplest possible solution a.k.a. KISS and then take it from there when problem arises –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 4 '12 at 8:56
    
That's true! I just proposed you a way to solve this. I also found another problem: the first occurrence of cat cannot be on the last line. Dunno how to solve that one! –  bernard paulus Sep 4 '12 at 9:34
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An awk solution:

awk '/cat/ && c == 0 {c = 1; print "giraffe"}; {print}' \
     BestAnimals.txt

If the animals you want to insert are in "MyOtherBestAnimals.txt" you can also do

awk '/cat/ && c == 0 {c = 1; system("cat MyOtherBestAnimals.txt") }; {print} ' \
     BestAnimals.txt

This answer can basically be broken down as follows, because ; separates the awk condition-action pairs:

  • /cat/ && c == 0 { c = 1; ... } sets c to 1 at the first row containing cat. The commands put at the ... are then executed, but only once, because c is 1 now.
  • {print} is the action print with no condition: prints any input line. This is done after the above condition-action pair.

Depending on what is actually at the ..., giraffe is printed, or the contents of "MyOtherBestAnimals.txt" is sent to the standard output, before printing the first line containing "cat".

Edit

After analysis of @glenn jackman's solution, it seems this solution can still be improved: when using input file

nyan cat
cat

the data is appended before nyan cat and not before the line equal to cat. The solution is then to request the full line to be equal to cat:

awk '$0 == "cat" && c == 0 {c = 1; print "giraffe"}; {print}' \
     BestAnimals.txt

for the insertion of a single line and

awk '$0 == "cat" && c == 0 {c = 1; system("cat MyOtherBestAnimals.txt") }; {print} ' \
     BestAnimals.txt

for the insertion of a file

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1  
The OP wants to insert before cat not after dog –  glenn jackman Sep 3 '12 at 18:56
    
corrected to insert before cat . My bad :) –  bernard paulus Sep 3 '12 at 20:06
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awk -v insert=giraffe -v before=cat '
  $1 == before && ! inserted {
    print insert
    inserted++
  }
  {print}
' BestAnimals.txt > NewBestAnimals.txt
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Please explain the answer. –  John Saunders Sep 3 '12 at 19:12
    
define two variables insert that takes the value "giraffe" and dito for variable before. for each line: if first WS separated token e.g. "dog" matches the content of variable before and variable inserted isn't defined print variable insert i.e. "giraffe. Increment inserted variable so that subsequent matched doesn't yield a print. Finally, default action for all lines is print i.e. output the input line. Beautiful solution as always from Mr @glennjackman :-) –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 4 '12 at 10:50
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I would:

  1. Use grep to find the line number of the first match
  2. Use head to get the text leading up to the match
  3. Insert the new content using cat
  4. Use tail to get the lines after the match

It's neither quick, efficient nor elegant. But it's pretty straight-forward, and if the file isn't gigantic and/or you need to do this many times a second, it should be fine.

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I'm just trying to automate a boring task because I'm a computer scientist so speed doesn't really matter, there are about 500 files! –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 13:28
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If you know (or somehow find out) the line:

sed -n '/cat/=' BestAnimals.txt

You can use sed:

sed -i '2i giraffe' BestAnimals.txt
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How do you do this for multiple words? I get sed: -e expression #1, char 4: extra characters after command –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 14:00
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