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I am working on a training program that has a Training class, with a function that returns a random method (one of the exercise types).

This generic class is extended by some specific classes, wich contain exercise of different types.

I then create an array of the specific classes, and want to choose a random one, then call the random exercise method.

Here’s the generic class

public class TrainingClasses {
Method[] mMethods;
Random randomGenerator; 
 public void TraningClasses() {
    randomGenerator = new Random();

    /* Store methods */
    mMethods= getClass().getDeclaredMethods();


}

 public void RandomExercise() {
    Random randGenerator = new Random();
    int rnd = randGenerator.nextInt(mMethods.length);

mMethods[rnd].invoke(this);

}

This is an example of specific training class

 public class MatheMagic extends TrainingClasses{


public MatheMagic() { 
/*Something*/
 }



public String[] SomeExercise() { 
    /*Some code */
 }

public String[] SomeOtherExercise() { 
    /*Some code */
 }      
}

At this point in the main activity I want to do this:

private Object[] mTrainingClasses; 
private MatheMagic mMathMag;
/*eventually other training classes*/
mMathMag = new MatheMagic();
mTrainingClasses[0] = mMathMag;

Random randGenerator = new Random();
int rnd = randGenerator.nextInt(mTrainingClasses.length);
Object aTrain = mTrainingClasses[rnd];

/*Return exercise*/
String[] mRes = aTrain.RandomExercise();

This are the relevant part of the code, which is now still incomplete... However I can’t go on since I get type mismatch errors, when I try to store the result of the dynamically called method. It’s likely that the project structure is incorrect, and that I should use some other architecture... However, I haven’t yet found out any better idea.

Thanks to anybody able to help.

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Thank you guys for the answers. Here is the final working code for whoever might need this:

/** Common interface for all exercises */ 
public interface Exercise {
  public String[] run();
} 



/** Common interface for all training classes */
public abstract class TrainingClass {

  private Random rand = new Random();
  public ArrayList<Exercise> mExerciseTypes = new ArrayList<Exercise>();

  /** Run a random exercise */
  public String[] runRandomExercise() {
    int i = rand.nextInt(mExerciseTypes.size());
    return mExerciseTypes.get(i).run();
  }

}


/*Specific training class*/

public class MatheMagic extends TrainingClass {

 public MatheMagic() {

        class SomeExercise implements Exercise {

            public String[] run() {

                 String[] mRes = new String[2];
                  mRes[0] = "Question type 1";
                  mRes[1] = "Answer type 1";
                return mRes;
            }

        }

        class SomeOtherExercise implements Exercise {

            public String[] run() {

                 String[] mRes = new String[2];
                  mRes[0] = "Question type 2";
                  mRes[1] = "Answer type 2";
                return mRes;
            }

        }
        SomeExercise mN = new SomeExercise();

        SomeOtherExercise mS = new SomeOtherExercise();

        mExerciseTypes.add(mN);
        mExerciseTypes.add(mS);
 }

}
share|improve this question
    
First, all TrainingClass-subclasses should implement some interface which is then accessed, Then there shouldn't be any class cast errors. –  DaDaDom Sep 3 '12 at 13:52
    
Its likely you are trying to invoke a method which takes some arguments. What is the whole message? Can you print out the method you were trying to call when the error occurred? –  Peter Lawrey Sep 3 '12 at 13:54
    
String[] mRes = aTrain.RandomExercise(); aTrain is an Object, so the call of RandomExercice() can't work without a cast I guess –  Kiwy Sep 3 '12 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you should probably re-think your design. Using reflection should usually be avoided in most situations. The only times you really need reflection are when you are dynamically loading and executing code (e.g. the JUnit framework dynamically loads and executes tests in a class whose name is passed as a command-line argument).

Instead of randomly executing a method in a class I would suggest creating a collection of Exercise objects with a common interface, choosing one of them at random and then running it. Here's some skeleton code for what I'm thinking:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;

/** Common interface for all training classes */
public abstract class TrainingClass {

  private Random rand = new Random();
  protected ArrayList<Exercise> exercises = new ArrayList<Exercise>();

  /** Run a random exercise */
  public String[] runRandomExercise() {
    int i = rand.nextInt(exercises.size());
    return exercises.get(i).run();
  }

}

/** Common interface for all exercises */ 
public interface Exercise {
  String[] run();
}

public class MatheMagic extends TrainingClass {

  /** Constructor creates all the exercises */
  public MatheMagic() {
    // Some exercise
    exercises.add(new Exercise {
      public String[] run() {
        // Code for some exercise ...
      }
    });
    // Some other exercise
    exercises.add(new Exercise {
      public String[] run() {
        // Code for some other exercise ...
      }
    });
    // etc ...
  }

}

Since all the exercises are of type Exercise and have a common run() method there is no need to use reflection. The declaration is a bit more verbose since you need to create an anonymous inner class for each exercise, but the extra bit of verbosity is well worth it for avoiding reflection!

share|improve this answer
1  
This looks great! I found a couple of problems: I had to change exercises from protected to public, and to esplicitly declare the classes that implements Exercise, to avoid syntax error. I’m not sure, but may it be that it’s Eclipse being fussy? However, that wasn’t a big deal and this solved the problem, so thank you very much! I’m editing my question with the working code. –  DavidTonarini Sep 3 '12 at 22:33
    
Great! I'm glad you got it working. I really should have added a disclaimer in my post saying that the code was completely untested and probably had syntax errors. I'm glad you got it working though! –  DaoWen Sep 3 '12 at 22:40

If you are manually creating your array of training classes (i.e. not by reflection), you can change your array type holding your classes to:

private TrainingClasses[] mTrainingClasses; 

and the type of the class you are randomly selecting to:

TrainingClasses aTrain = mTrainingClasses[rnd];

This should allow you to call the RandomExercise method on aTrain.

share|improve this answer

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