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I'm trying to do an insert with sed (having just read up on it) and i'm being stumped by trying to insert multiple lines?

What i'm currently doing is:

sed -i "${line} i\
        /* Name - ID */ \
        select  @ID = NULL \
        from    Animals \
        where   VrsnID = @VrsnID \
        and     Request= \"Request\" \
 \
" animalNames.txt

Note echo $line == 131

New Problem

Everything appears on one line in the output? (also missing the first indent)

/* Name - ID */        select  @ID = NULL         from    Animals         where   VrsnID = @VrsnID         and     Request= "Request"

Resolved

But this throws:

sed: -e expression #1, char 47: unknown command: `
'

Any idea why?

Thanks for your time

share|improve this question
    
Which version of sed do you use ? GNU/BSD ? –  Zulu Sep 3 '12 at 14:19
    
GNU sorry didn't realize that made a dif –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 14:21
    
Works here, GNU sed version 4.2.1 –  Thor Sep 3 '12 at 14:31
    
I'm not sure what i've changed but it works now, but everything is on one line? –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 14:32
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For the new trouble : Use double backslash \\

share|improve this answer
    
Amazing thank you, why could I not find this anywhere in google (must have made 20+ searches for "sed multiple line insert") –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 14:44
1  
Because for multiline it's better to use AWK. (in my opinion) –  Zulu Sep 3 '12 at 14:46
    
On a side note, is it possible to read a file for the insert "contents" instead of C&P into the sed command? –  Pez Cuckow Sep 3 '12 at 14:46
    
@PezCuckow : Yes, with -f argument. You can make sed's script file. –  Zulu Sep 3 '12 at 14:48
    
@PezCuckow Yes, with the r command. –  Gilles Sep 3 '12 at 14:49
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In a shell script, backslash+newline expands to nothing. It's a way to continue to the next line without actually having a newline in the string. So what sed sees is just one big line. Compare:

$ echo "foo\
> bar"
foobar
$ echo "foo
> bar"
foo
bar

You need to pass a backslash and a newline to sed, so escape the backslash by putting another backslash before it.

sed -i "${line} i\\
        /* Name - ID */ \\
        select  @ID = NULL \\
        from    Animals \\
        where   VrsnID = @VrsnID \\
        and     Request= \"Request\" \\

" animalNames.txt

This may be more readable if you pass the script on the standard input as a here document. You need to leave expansion on to substitute ${line}, so you still need to double the backslash.

sed -i -f - animalNames.txt <<EOF
${line} i\\
        /* Name - ID */ \\
        select  @ID = NULL \\
        from    Animals \\
        where   VrsnID = @VrsnID \\
        and     Request= "Request" \\

EOF
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the further info Gilles! –  Pez Cuckow Sep 4 '12 at 8:53
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This might work for you:

sed ${line}'i\
    /* Name - ID */ \
    select  @ID = NULL \
    from    Animals \
    where   VrsnID = @VrsnID \
    and     Request= \"Request\"

' animalNames.txt
share|improve this answer
    
You need to use \\ for a new line –  Pez Cuckow Sep 4 '12 at 8:54
    
@PezCuckow for me (using GNU sed and bash) a single \ is suffice. –  potong Sep 4 '12 at 19:15
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