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I was on the IBM page looking for some filenet example code for .NET and I found this:

namespace CESample
{
    // Represents the connection with the Content Engine.
    public class CEConnection
    {
        private IDomain domain;
        private IObjectStoreSet ost;
        private ArrayList osNames;
        private String domainName;
        private bool isCredentialsEstablished;

        // Constructor
        public CEConnection()
        {
            domain = null;
            ost = null;
            osNames = new ArrayList();
            domainName = null;
            isCredentialsEstablished = false;
        }

        //... other methods

Its this alright, to set always every variable to null while creating an object? And How about the bool and new ArrayList()? Is that how we should do that? Setting boolean always to false?

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1  
Collections are generally tested by Count > 0 and not by != null, that's why they are typically initialised. Setting a bool to false is to a secure approach, to avoid false-positives. Everything else would be null by default, anyway. –  Andre Calil Sep 3 '12 at 14:55
    
    
@AndreCalil: isCredentialsEstablished is false by default, as default(bool) == false. Explicitly setting it to false provides no benefit whatsoever. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 3 '12 at 14:56
    
@Andre: As per Jons advice, I would suggest using Any() instead of Count (which is not available on IEnumerable) or Count() which might actually loop over all items compared to Any() which does not. –  Laoujin Sep 3 '12 at 15:04
    
@Laoujin It's fine, but it'll throw an exception if the collection is not initialised anyway –  Andre Calil Sep 3 '12 at 15:11
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Everything except the array list is unneeded.

Fields are automatically initialized with their respective default value before the code inside the constructor is executed.

This code is equivalent:

public class CEConnection 
{ 
    private IDomain domain; 
    private IObjectStoreSet ost; 
    private ArrayList osNames; 
    private String domainName; 
    private bool isCredentialsEstablished; 

    // Constructor 
    public CEConnection() 
    { 
        osNames = new ArrayList(); 
    } 
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1  
If you have several constructor, you can place the new ArrayList() next to the declaration to avoid code duplicates. –  Seb Sep 3 '12 at 14:57
    
That's correct. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 3 '12 at 14:57
    
Is there maybe another reason they are doing this? Or could be there reason why some people would manually set objects = null in the constructor? I thought IBM people are one of the best programers on this planet, wondering why they did this... –  silla Sep 3 '12 at 14:59
2  
@EamonNerbonne: I agree with the first part of your comment, but not with the last one. Making accessibility explicit is a good idea. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 3 '12 at 17:11
1  
@EamonNerbonne: While I'd avoid assigning default values to fields that already have those default values, I disagree with you on accessibility, and the reason is consistency. No matter where it appears in your code, a field of a given type always has the default value for that type. But default accessibility changes depending on its location. Namely, the default accessibility of types at the namespace level is internal, but the default accessibilty for types (or anything else) that lie within another type is private. –  Adam Robinson Sep 6 '12 at 12:23
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It's "alright" in the sense that it will not cause unexpected behavior, waste any resources, or cause your code to become less readable.

It's unnecessary, as all of those variables (other than osNames) will already have those values by the time the constructor is called. Unlike local variables, instance and static variables always have a value (even if that value is null), and thus to not require initialization before use.

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Yup - objects gets the default value null, bools get the default value false, so asides from the list initialisation that constructor code is pretty pointless. –  Henry Wilson Sep 3 '12 at 14:57
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It's all right to set it to any value whatsoever that will compile.

The real question is, "is this a meaningful and valid state to start this class in, considering the parameters passed to the constructor?" which in this case means no parameters.

That's the constructor's job, to put the class into a state that is:

  1. Valid for the semantics of the class.
  2. Relevant to the parameters, if any.

Anything that does that, is fine.

Anything that doesn't do that is a heavy (and hence quite possibly ill-advised) optimisation at best, a serious flaw at worse.

Relatedly, it is also the responsibility of any method or property that changes the state of the class, to leave it in a valid state.

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When a field variable is declared, it is automatically initialized to default(T). This is null for reference variables, false for booleans and 0 for 'numeric' ValueTypes (Integer, Double, Decimal, ...)

Those initialisers are thus clutter. They just make the code longer.

Do note that default(T) for ArrayList is also null so you would still have to set that one to a new instance of ArrayList.

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