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I have a char **s; And it is sent to a func:

func(&s);

bool func(char ***p);

Now, I want to find whether a particular string is present in s; I can do:

while (*s) {
if (strcmp(*s, "MyString") == 0) found;
s++;
}

But is there any shortcut to do this? function 'func' can fill specific strings which are limited and pre-defined.

Thanks Ram

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2  
Can you explain can fill specific strings which are limited and pre-defined.? I don't quite follow. –  hmjd Sep 3 '12 at 15:00
    
I think he means that much the same way he has "MyString" hard-coded into the example code, func will use specific pre-defined strings. I could be wrong. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '12 at 15:12
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is indeed the function strstr of the C standard library, which finds the first occurrence of a substring in an other string. Let's assume that s is a pointer to a string.

if (strstr(*s, "MyString") != NULL) {
    /* found */
} else {
    /* not found */
}

If s is an array of strings, you have to run through your array, and compare the current string and the substring with strstr.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <string.h>

int
f(char const **p, char const *q, size_t nmemb)
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < nmemb; ++i)
        if (strstr(p[i], q) != NULL)
            return 1;
    return 0;
}

If all of your strings have the same size, you can use indeed strcmp.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <string.h>

int
f(char const **p, char const *q, size_t nmemb, size_t size)
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < nmemb; ++i)
       if (strncmp(p[i], q, size) == 0)
            return 1;
    return 0;
}

An other solution is to sort your array, and then search your element.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int
cmp(void const *p, void const *q)
{
    return strcmp((char const *)p, (char const *)q);
}

int
search(char const **p, char const *q, size_t nmemb, size_t size)
{
    return bsearch(q, p, nmemb, size, cmp);
}

void
sort(char const **p, size_t nmemb, size_t size)
{
    qsort(p, nmemb, size, cmp);
}
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Thanks everyone for the replies, but I also need to know which string is missing, so that there are actions based on that...so I think there is no other way than using strstr or strcmp and store '1' into an int array if a string is missing...and so on...assuming there is a mapping between array index and a string.. Thanks –  Ram Sep 3 '12 at 15:21
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Look at the function strstr finds the first occurance of a string in another string.

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1  
const char * strstr ( const char * str1, const char * str2 ); searches in another string...but I have set of strings (char **) –  Ram Sep 3 '12 at 14:56
    
Well, just call strstr on each of these strings one bye one. –  Eregrith Sep 3 '12 at 15:01
1  
Calling strstr on each string is same as strcmp that OP posted. –  Blue Moon Sep 3 '12 at 15:04
    
I missunderstood, in that case, no there's no shortcut. Recommend you make your own solution into a function. –  weston Sep 3 '12 at 16:14
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Not really, the standard C library has only the bare bones functions to operate with strings. There is little support for string arrays (or other "complex" data structures like linked lists ...).

That said, since everyone needs those, you should check the libraries and utilities linked to your code. If you give us a list, we might be able to point something out.

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No, there is no function to find a string in an array of strings in the C standard library.

Since you have an array of strings (or more precisely an array of char arrays), you need to loop through each item and check if it matches. You can either use strcmp or strstr, but that doesn't really matter.

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The posted code char **s; ... while (*s) ... s++ wouldn't work with an array of char arrays, presumably what the questioner has is an array of pointer-to-char. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '12 at 15:10
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just modify your while loop as follow..

while (**s) 
{
if (strcmp(**s, "MyString") == 0) found;
s++;
}
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