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How PEiD and other tools detect compiler type? Can the detection process be dynamic? and how? Is there any other procedure instead of PE file processing?

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What I know is that there are different ways to to map HLL to LLL based on the compiler used, especially when compiling loops, conditions ..etc. these differ form one compiler to another. For example if an executable needs CRT lib, be sure that was compiled by MSVC++. –  Aan Sep 3 '12 at 18:02

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Compiler type detection is based on compiler signature in EXE file.

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So this is a static method.What if this signature was deleted? –  n1kita Sep 3 '12 at 20:18
    
Sorry, I never testing delete signature. :-) –  Xearinox Sep 4 '12 at 5:52

While I am not entirely sure how PEiD works, I think there are various ways to achieve this. Particularly, you want to look for various kinds of "fingerprints" from the produced code. For example the way the compiler handles known strings in the binary(zero-terminated as in C, or with a length value before the text as in Pascal) or how it sets up the stack frame for a function. Then of course looking for common code constructs, how certain structures are handled such as loops, conditionals or setting the runtime before calling the main function. Another approach would be to take a look at the imports and dependencies which could give insight on the used runtime.

Of course, the easiest way is to check any metadata left in the binary file without actually looking at the code at all. Often there are sections devoted for all kinds of metadata and even comments which can accurately reveal the exact compiler and version used for compiling. These can be spoofed with ease though, but a good detector takes this into account and looks at the actual code for clues.

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