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I know what is the difference between unshift() and push() methods in Javascript, but I'm wondering what is the difference in time complexity?

I suppose for push() method is O(1) because you're just adding an item to the end of array, but I'm not sure for unshift() method, because, I suppose you must "move" all the other existing elements forward and I suppose that is O(log n) or O(n)?

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what do you mean by time complexity? execution time? –  i-- Sep 3 '12 at 15:36
    
With a smart sparse array implementation, unshift could be close to constant-time, but I have to wonder if it'd be worth it to complicate normal array access. I personally don't think I've ever written a call to unshift. –  Pointy Sep 3 '12 at 15:38
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@therao - He means the standard computer science definition in big-O terms. –  Nemo Sep 3 '12 at 15:43
    
Nemo gave the answer. –  Peric Sep 3 '12 at 15:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The JavaScript language spec does not mandate the time complexity of these functions, as far as I know.

It is certainly possible to implement an array-like data structure (O(1) random access) with O(1) push and unshift operations. The C++ std::deque is an example. A Javascript implementation that used C++ deques to represent Javascript arrays internally would therefore have O(1) push and unshift operations.

But if you need to guarantee such time bounds, you will have to roll your own, like this:

http://code.stephenmorley.org/javascript/queues/

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imho it depends on the javascript-engine... if it will use a linked list, unshift should be quite cheap...

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What do you mean under complexity? It is native code, javascript-engine developers may implement it in different ways. Of course it may be done with O(1) complexity (in c it is trivial).

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