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I am seeking for a way to speed up a file loading like this :

The data contains about 1 millions lines, tab separated with "\t" (tabulation char) and utf8 encoding, it takes about 9 seconds to parse the full file with the code below. However, I would have like to be almost in an order of a second!

def load(filename):
    features = []
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f:
        previous = ""
        for n, s in enumerate(f):
            splitted = tuple(s.rstrip().split("\t"))
            if len(splitted) != 2:
                sys.exit("wrong format!")
            if previous >= splitted:
                sys.exit("unordered feature")
            previous = splitted
            features.append(splitted)
    return features   

I am wondering if any binary format data could speed up something? Or if I could benefit from a some NumPy or any other libraries to have faster loading speed.

Maybe you could give me advice on another speed bottleneck?

EDIT: so i try some of your ideas, thanks! BTW i really need the tuple (string, string) inside the huge list... here are the results, i'm gaining 50% of the time :) now i am going to look after the NumPy binary data, as i have noticed that another huge file was really really quick to load...

import codecs

def load0(filename): 
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f: 
    return f.readlines() 

def load1(filename): 
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f: 
    return [tuple(x.rstrip().split("\t")) for x in f.readlines()]

def load3(filename):
    features = []
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f:
    for n, s in enumerate(f):
        splitted = tuple(s.rstrip().split("\t"))
        features.append(splitted)
    return features

def load4(filename): 
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f: 
    for s in f: 
        yield tuple(s.rstrip().split("\t")) 

a = datetime.datetime.now()
r0 = load0(myfile)
b = datetime.datetime.now()
print "f.readlines(): %s" % (b-a)

a = datetime.datetime.now()
r1 = load1(myfile)
b = datetime.datetime.now()
print """[tuple(x.rstrip().split("\\t")) for x in f.readlines()]: %s""" % (b-a)

a = datetime.datetime.now()
r3 = load3(myfile)
b = datetime.datetime.now()
print """load3: %s""" % (b-a)
if r1 == r3: print "OK: speeded and similars!"

a = datetime.datetime.now()
r4 = [x for x in load4(myfile)] 
b = datetime.datetime.now()
print """load4: %s""" % (b-a)
if r4 == r3: print "OK: speeded and similars!"

results :

f.readlines(): 0:00:00.208000
[tuple(x.rstrip().split("\t")) for x in f.readlines()]: 0:00:02.310000
load3: 0:00:07.883000
OK: speeded and similars!
load4: 0:00:07.943000
OK: speeded and similars!

something very strange is that i notice that i can have almost double time on two consecutive runs (but not everytime) :

>>> ================================ RESTART ================================
>>> 
f.readlines(): 0:00:00.220000
[tuple(x.rstrip().split("\t")) for x in f.readlines()]: 0:00:02.479000
load3: 0:00:08.288000
OK: speeded and similars!
>>> ================================ RESTART ================================
>>> 
f.readlines(): 0:00:00.279000
[tuple(x.rstrip().split("\t")) for x in f.readlines()]: 0:00:04.983000
load3: 0:00:10.404000
OK: speeded and similars!

EDIT LATEST: well i tried to modify to use the numpy.load... it is very strange to me... from "normal" file with my 1022860 strings, and 10 KB. After doing a numpy.save(numpy.array(load1(myfile))) i went to a 895 MB ! an then reloading this with numpy.load() i get this kind of timing on consecutive runs :

  >>> ================================ RESTART ================================
  loading: 0:00:11.422000 done.
  >>> ================================ RESTART ================================
  loading: 0:00:00.759000 done.

may be does numpy do some memory stuff to avoid future reload?

share|improve this question
1  
What are you trying to do? Why do you compare strings previous and splitted the way you do? Have you looked into list comprehension? For example, see this related SO post. –  Tim Sep 3 '12 at 15:46
    
actually this comparison is just a way to ensure that the file format is ok. Removing these 2 tests i only gain 09.09 => 08.38 seconds. My real problem is how can i read a file mixing tuple(string, string) tab separated as fast as possible. I almost can remove these tests, BTW doing this, i am still 7 seconds too slow :/ –  user1340802 Sep 3 '12 at 15:52
2  
Do you really need to collect all the "features" in a big list? Maybe you can just traverse the lines by making this a generator function, and iterate over that. –  Keith Sep 3 '12 at 16:01
    
@Keith, well i do not know, actually i am trying to speed up an external library (mit licence) that i wanted to embed in a webservice, i notice that the huge bottleneck was the loading of these features. I should dive more deeply to check if i can refactorize the whole thing... but it may not be my main priority - speeding it without rewriting everything, would be enough for now –  user1340802 Sep 4 '12 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

check how many seconds is to actually read the lines of the file, like

def load(filename):
    features = []
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f:
        return f.readlines()

If it is significantly less then 9 sec, then

  1. try other to use multiprocessing and split the work of checking lines between cpu cores and/or
  2. use faster interpreter like pypy

and see if any of these speed things up

share|improve this answer
    
looks like the fastest, as i load it f.readlines(): 0:00:00.208000 BTW i also need the splitting, mixing with Burhan Khalid allow me to gain a lot of time... going to look if i can go in less 2 or 1 seconds... Numpy may be promising, if there is any compatible struct. –  user1340802 Sep 4 '12 at 12:32

Try this version, since you mentioned the checking wasn't important I have eliminated it.

def load(filename):
    with codecs.open(filename, 'rb',  'utf-8') as f:
        for s in f:
            yield tuple(s.rstrip().split("\t"))

results = [x for x in load('somebigfile.txt')]
share|improve this answer
    
this is very strange, this method looks not particularly fast :/ see my load4 that is your suggestion, BTW inspired by your answer load1 is much more faster! i can not explain it... now i am going to check any Numpy binary way.. –  user1340802 Sep 4 '12 at 12:30
    
i do not know which answer to accept :/ i finally mix from almost the three... –  user1340802 Sep 7 '12 at 15:03

Having checked how long does it take to just iterate over the file, as bpgergo suggests, you can check the following:

  • If you know that your file contains 10^6 rows, you could preallocate the list. It should be faster than appending to it in each iteration. Just use features = [None] * (10 ** 6) to initialize your list
  • Don't cast the result of split() onto tuple, it doesn't seem necessary.
  • You don't seem to benefit from enumerate at all. Just use: for line in f: instead of for n, s in enumerate(f):
share|improve this answer
    
Your first and third bullet points contradict each other. :) –  Dougal Sep 3 '12 at 16:06
    
i think that the cast to tuple was necessary for the ordering check with previous >= splitted but i may be wrong... –  user1340802 Sep 4 '12 at 12:34
    
@user1340802: split() returns a list, so it can be compared in just the same way as tuple. The only benefit from casting may be that the author needs immutable entries in later processing. –  Abgan Sep 5 '12 at 10:34
    
@Dougal: I didn't say he has to try all my advices simultaneously :) –  Abgan Sep 5 '12 at 10:35

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