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I have a mktime issue, if the hour does not exist because of DST change, then mktime on windows using MSVS 2010 will return a time_t in the past, in my case for 23:00, when it should return 1:00AM next day (on Linux it is returning 1:00AM as it should). My issue is happening on Brazil timezone (GMT -3) exactly when the auto adjust daylight saving time should happen. In their case this is happening on 21.Oct.2012 at 0:00 AM (this will become 1:00 AM).

This is a part of the code:

/* test_date1.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
*
*/
#include "StdAfx.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

time_t mytime=1350784881;
struct tm *timeinfo;
char *tz;

/*time ( &mytime ); */
timeinfo = localtime ( &mytime );

printf("%.2d/%.2d/%.4d, %.2d:%.2d isdst?=%d\n", 
timeinfo->tm_mday, timeinfo->tm_mon, timeinfo->tm_year,  timeinfo->tm_hour, timeinfo-> tm_min, timeinfo -> tm_isdst);

timeinfo->tm_mday=21;
timeinfo->tm_mon=9;
timeinfo->tm_year=112;
timeinfo->tm_hour=0;
timeinfo->tm_min=0;
timeinfo->tm_isdst=-1;

printf("The shit: %.2d/%.2d/%.4d, %.2d:%.2d isdst?=%d\n", 
    timeinfo->tm_mday, timeinfo->tm_mon, timeinfo->tm_year,  timeinfo->tm_hour, timeinfo-> tm_min, timeinfo -> tm_isdst);

mytime= mktime(timeinfo);
printf("mytime is=%d\n", mytime);

timeinfo = localtime ( &mytime );

printf("%.2d/%.2d/%.4d, %.2d:%.2d isdst?=%d\n", 
    timeinfo->tm_mday, timeinfo->tm_mon, timeinfo->tm_year,  timeinfo->tm_hour, timeinfo-> tm_min, timeinfo -> tm_isdst);

return 0;
}

The results on Windows are:

20/09/0112, 23:01 isdst?=0
21/09/0112, 00:00 isdst?=-1
mytime is=1350784800
20/09/0112, 23:00 isdst?=0

And on Linux are:

20/09/0112, 23:01 isdst?=0
21/09/0112, 00:00 isdst?=-1
mytime is=1350788400
21/09/0112, 01:00 isdst?=1

As you can see mytime diff is 3600 seconds between what time_t returns the C from Unix and what returns the C from Microsoft Visual Studio 2010.

This program should run on different platforms (UNIX/WINDOWS/etc) and on any timezone, so I should not hardcode the timezone.

As you saw the problem is on Windows where the time is returned wrongly. In this moment I don't know how to fix this issue. Did someone had this particular problem? How did you solved it? I specifically need the beginging of the Local Day.

Thanks a lot,

Jokerush

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Always document the OS version when you ask a question like this. See what the TZ environment variable gets you. –  Hans Passant Sep 3 '12 at 17:10

1 Answer 1

I don't know if the behaviour of mktime is defined when you pass it an invalid time, so this might not actually be a bug.

At any rate, short of re-implementing mktime yourself, you'll need to work around the problem. I propose the following algorithm:

  • Build a struct tm for 9am on the day in question.
  • Convert to time_t.
  • Subtract 24 hours from the time_t.

If there's no daylight savings change, then at this point you're looking at 9am the previous day. If daylight savings started, you're looking at 8am; if it finished, you're looking at 10am.

  • Convert back to a struct tm.
  • Compare the date in the struct tm to the original date.
  • If it isn't the right day yet, add an hour to the time_t and try again.

Since you're only adding an hour at a time, once you've got the date you wanted, you can be sure you've got the earliest time on that date.

I'm making a few assumptions that I think are currently safe: that daylight savings time never starts or finishes part way through an hour, that it never starts or finishes between 8am and 10am, and that it never changes by more than an hour.

I'm intentionally not assuming that daylight savings never starts or finishes in the evening (e.g., 11pm becomes midnight or vice-versa) or in the early morning (e.g., 2am becomes 3am or vice-versa, which as it happens is exactly what happens here).

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