Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need help with the performance of the following code. It does a memcpy on two dynamically allocated arrays of arbitrary size:

int main()
{
  double *a, *b;
  unsigned n = 10000000, i;
  a = malloc(n*sizeof(double));
  b = malloc(n*sizeof(double));
  for(i=0; i<n; i++) {
    a[i] = 1.0;
    /* b[i] = 0.0; */
  }

  tic();
  bzero(b, n*sizeof(double));
  toc("bzero1");

  tic();
  bzero(b, n*sizeof(double));
  toc("bzero2");

  tic();
  memcpy(b, a, n*sizeof(double));
  toc("memcpy");
}

tic/toc measure the execution time.

On my computer it takes 0.035s to memcpy (Linux, gcc version 4.4.6). If I now uncomment the line which initializes the destination array b, the code is three times faster (!) - 0.011s.

I have observed similar behavior when using a loop instead of memcpy. Usually I do not care about this since it is enough to 'initialize' the memory before using it. However, I now need to perform a simple memory copy, and do it as fast as possible. Initializing the data requires writing e.g. 0 to the memory, which is not necessary and takes time. And I would like to perform a memory copy with all available memory bandwidth.

Is there a solution to this problem? Or is it connected to the way Linux handles dynamic memory (some sort of lazy page allocation?) and can not be worked around? How is it on other systems?

Edit: The same results are obtained with gcc 4.6. I used -O3 to compile.

Edit: Thank you all for your comments. I do understand that memory mapping takes time. I guess I just have a hard time accepting that it takes so long, much longer than the actual memory access. The code has been modified to include a benchmark of the initialization of array b using two subsequent bzero calls. The timings now show

bzero1 0.273981
bzero2 0.056803
memcpy 0.117934

Clearly, the first bzero call does much more than just stream zeros to memory - that is memory mapping and memory zeroing. The second bzero call on the other hand takes half of the time required to do a memcpy, which is exactly as expected - write only time vs. read and write time. I understand that the overhead of the second bzero call must be there due to OS security reasons. What about the rest? Can I not decrease it somehow, e.g. use larger memory pages? Different kernel settings?

I should mention that I run this on Ubuntu wheeze.

share|improve this question
2  
Did you compile with a recent GCC compiler (e.g. gcc-4.7) and did you enable optimizations (e.g. -O3)? –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 3 '12 at 16:18
4  
I wonder if it has to do with the cache; initializing b causes it to be loaded into cache before your timer is active. –  mah Sep 3 '12 at 16:21
    
@mah It is not cache because b is 80MB. –  usr Sep 3 '12 at 16:33
1  
Somewhat Related: Why does malloc initialize the values to 0 in gcc? - Your allocation is large enough where it will invoke lazy allocation and incur zeroing overhead. –  Mysticial Sep 3 '12 at 16:35
1  
I would suggest asking your follow up question about reducing the time taken to map memory as a new question, and linking to this question. This is because it doesn't really match the tags c, memcpy or malloc anymore, and also this question now has a bunch of answers and comments that are not relevant to your new question. –  verdesmarald Sep 3 '12 at 17:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first bzero runs longer because of (1) lazy page allocation and (2) lazy page zero-initialization by kernel. While second reason is unavoidable because of security reasons, lazy page allocation may be optimized by using larger ("huge") pages.

There are at least two ways to use huge pages on Linux. Hard way is hugetlbfs. Easy way is Transparent huge pages.

Search khugepaged in the list of processes on your system. If such process exists, transparent huge pages are supported, you can use them in your application if you change malloc to this:

posix_memalign((void **)&b, 2*1024*1024, n*sizeof(double));
madvise((void *)b, n*sizeof(double), MADV_HUGEPAGE);
share|improve this answer
    
That indeed removed the 'memory mapping' overhead and left only the initial zeroing of the data. I wonder if this will work with OpenMP on NUMA architectures with the effect of binding the memory to a specific NUMA node, depending on which CPU the calling thread runs (first-touch memory allocation). But I guess there is no reason why it should not. Thanks! –  angainor Sep 4 '12 at 10:53
    
I think, there should be no problem if you bind the memory to a specific NUMA node in aligned pieces of size, which is a multiple of 2 megabytes or if these pieces are much larger than 2 megabytes. For smaller pieces, it is hard to say what is better - huge pages without TLB problems and with faster allocation or normal pages, properly distributed between NUMA nodes. –  Evgeny Kluev Sep 4 '12 at 11:23

It's probably lazy page allocation, Linux only mapping the pages on first access. IIRC each page in a new block in Linux is a copy-on-write of a blank page, and your allocations are big enough to demand new blocks.

If you want to work around it, you could write one byte or word, at 4k intervals. That might get the virtual addresses mapped to RAM slightly faster than writing the whole of each page.

I wouldn't expect (most efficient workaround to force the lazy memory mapping to happen) plus (copy) to be significantly faster than just (copy) without the initialization of b, though. So unless there's a specific reason why you care about the performance just of the copy, not of the whole operation, then it's fairly futile. It's "pay now or pay later", Linux pays later, and you're only measuring the time for later.

share|improve this answer
    
With my GNU/Linux, the first runs faster than the second. –  md5 Sep 3 '12 at 16:32
    
@Kirilenko: fair enough. Out of (A) init every byte (B) init one byte per page, and (C) init nothing: what's "the first", "the second", and the times involved? –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '12 at 16:34
    
The code of the OP (commented line), takes about 0.17s, and when I uncomment the line, 0.21s. –  md5 Sep 3 '12 at 16:49
    
@Steve Jessop I guess I was afraid it would be so. Initialization of only one value in every page does not help - the initialization part is two times slower than the memcpy part, which by the way has to both read and write the data. So even if lazy allocation would require zeroing of the array, it would only explain a quarter of the overhead, i.e. 0.05s (half of the time required to memcpy on initialized arrays). –  angainor Sep 3 '12 at 16:51
    
This has nothing to do with overcommit. Commit accounting and instantiation of physical pages to back virtual memory are two completely separate areas of memory management. They could in principle be combined, but doing so would give much worse cache utilization and overall worse performance. –  R.. Sep 3 '12 at 17:05

Surely if you are comparing the speed of initialise and copy to the speed of just copy, then the initialisation should be included in timed section. It appears to me you should actually be comparing this:

// Version 1
for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    a[i] = 1.0;

tic();

memcpy(b, a, n*sizeof(double));

toc();

To this:

// Version 2
for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    a[i] = 1.0;

tic();

for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    b[i] = 0.0;
memcpy(b, a, n*sizeof(double));

toc();

I expect this will see your 3x speed improvement drop sharply.

EDIT: As suggested by Steve Jessop, you may also want to test a third strategy of only touching one entry per page:

// Version 3
for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    a[i] = 1.0;

tic();

for(i=0; i<n; i+=DOUBLES_PER_PAGE)
    b[i] = 0.0;
memcpy(b, a, n*sizeof(double));

toc();
share|improve this answer
    
The whole point is that I do not want to pay for zeroing of the memory when I later copy other data to it. Anyway, assigning 0s to the array entries itself should only require half of the time it takes to memcpy on initialized arrays (read vs. read+write). The remaining overhead is hence caused by the OS and not a hardware limitation. I see no reason to include it in my time measurements, but I would gladly get rid of it by e.g. some system settings. –  angainor Sep 3 '12 at 16:55
    
@angainor You are going to have to pay the time required to map the pages either way, but you are including it in one measurement but not the other. Saying "look it's three times faster when I don't include the time taken to map 80mb worth of pages" is nice and all, but you are comparing apples to oranges. Saying "the code is three times faster (!)" is just plain fallacious. –  verdesmarald Sep 3 '12 at 17:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.