Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Most efficient way to cast List<SubClass> to List<BaseClass>
why polymorphism doesn't treat generic collections and plain arrays the same way?

If I have an abstract base class BaseClass and I write a function expecting Collection<BaseClass> as its argument, calls to that function with a Collection<SubClass> of a class SubClass extends BaseClass fail to compile.

In the base class:

public void addLots(Collection<BaseClass> collection) {
    for(BaseClass yourbase : collection) {
        us.add(yourbase) //what you say!!
    }
}

And in the subclass:

public void addMoreLots(Collection<SubClass> collection) {
    addLots(collection); //FAILS TO COMPILE
}

Now I think I can see why this is: Collection<SubClass> is NOT a subclass of Collection<BaseClass>. What is the correct method of making this call?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jigar Joshi, Mark Thomas, j0k, Deanna, Clyde Lobo Sep 4 '12 at 9:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Thanks—I couldn't find it though, and I think this addresses a different question (more focused on "how do I do this", less focused on "why are arrays different than collections"). This presumable applies to any generic, for example WeakReference. –  Andrew Wyld Sep 3 '12 at 17:07
    
PresumablY. Dagnammit. –  Andrew Wyld Sep 3 '12 at 17:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Collections are checked only during the compilation time, not during the run time, so this is done in order to protect a collection taking in the wrong type of object in.

Try it this way...

public <T extends BaseClass> void addLots(Collection<T> collection){ }

OR

public void addLots(Collection<? extends BaseClass> collection) {}

share|improve this answer
    
I already worked it out and posted my own answer, but thank you :) –  Andrew Wyld Sep 3 '12 at 17:05
1  
@AndrewWyld, nothing is more interesting and encouraging than finding an answer by ourself...... Keep it up... But please see i have mention both the ways to do it..... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Sep 3 '12 at 17:06
    
Good point. Thank you :) –  Andrew Wyld Sep 3 '12 at 17:08
    
You are welcome..... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Sep 3 '12 at 17:08

In a pinch, Collections.unmodifiableCollection(Collection<SubClass>) can return a Collection<BaseClass>. (It makes the collection unmodifiable, of course, but that's what makes it safe to treat a Collection<SubClass> as a Collection<BaseClass>.)

share|improve this answer

<? extends BaseClass> should replace <BaseClass>. The correct syntax for addLots is:

public void addLots(Collection<? extends BaseClass> collection) {
    for(BaseClass yourbase : collection) {
        us.add(yourbase) //what you say!!
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use

public void addLots(Collection<? extends BaseClass> collection) {
}

instead of

public void addLots(Collection<BaseClass> collection) {
}

which denotes a Collection of types which extends the base class can be a parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
I already worked it out, see below, but thank you :) –  Andrew Wyld Sep 3 '12 at 17:05
    
Great. Way to go. –  SiB Sep 3 '12 at 17:05
public void addLots(Collection<? extends BaseClass> collection) {
}

but with this you cannot call add to collection (i.e. you cannot do collection.add()),
but in this

public void addLots(Collection<? super SubClass> collection) {
}

you can call add (i.e. you can do collection.add()).

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.