Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function containing an ajax call:

function example(param, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: param,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "jsonp",
        success: function(data) {
            // do something with data
            callback(data);
        }
    });
}

I call it by:

example("http://www.example.com", function(result) {
    // do something with result
})

But, I'd like to use example() in this context:

text.replace(/[regex not shown]/g, function(){
    return RegExp.$1 + example(RegExp.$2); // does not work
});

i.e., the regex finds multiple matches, to which I then add example([whatever it matched]). Is there a way to integrate

example("http://www.example.com", function(result) {
    // do something with result
})

into the text.replace()?

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
4  
You will either need to turn example into a synchronous function (by setting the sync ajax fag, something with bad performance implications, or changing your logic to prefetch the data before doing the replace) or you would need to write your own asynchronous string-replace function. –  hugomg Sep 3 '12 at 17:46
    
What do you want example(RegExp.$2) to return? Do you want to block until the AJAX call returns and then return the result of that or...? –  lc. Sep 3 '12 at 17:46
    
@missingno: "prefetch the data before doing the replace" "asynchronous string-replace function" -- can you explain how I'd do that? Thanks! –  Rebecca Blackstone Sep 3 '12 at 17:49
    
@Ic.: example() returns a String, the problem with the asynchronous is that example(RegExp.$2) is undefined. I want to wait until the AJAX call is finished and return its result. –  Rebecca Blackstone Sep 3 '12 at 17:50
    
What you want is not possible this way, because .replace needs to wait for your callback. However, the built-in .replace function doesn't wait. You could match once to get the items to fetch, fetch them, and finally do the replacing with the items (which you now have directly available). –  pimvdb Sep 3 '12 at 18:02
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

You can't. That's because you are passing a to the .replace() method a function literal, so the replace method will take that function .toString() returned string (its source code) as an argument.

That is because .replace() method is synchronous and don't expect a callback as second argument, but a string, so it will convert any second argument to string if is not.

And if you actually call the function in the parameter, cause your function has no defined return value will parse "undefined" as second value.

But you can write your own asynchronous replace method and add it to the String prototype. I can't edit code in my phone, so when I get back to my computer I write it for you if you haven't figured out.

Edit:

Actually I was wrong, you can use a callback in the replace method. The problem is the way you are using an asynchronous call inside there. I don't know what are you exactly trying to do, so I hope this help you.

String.prototype.myReplace=function(re, o, p){
    var v=[];
    var t=this;
    t.toString().replace(re, function(m){
        if(m==RegExp.$1){v[1]=m;};
        if(m==RegExp.$2){v[2]=m;};
    });
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: v[2],
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "jsonp",
        success: function(data) {
            // do something with data

            o[p]=t.toString().replace(re, function(m){
                if(m==RegExp.$1){return v[1];};
                if(m==RegExp.$2){return data.toString();};
            });
        }
    });
};

And call it like this:

text.myReplace(/[regex not shown]/g, this/* or whatever object is */, 'text'});
share|improve this answer
add comment

Create a function to make the ajax call and handle the replacement of matches on a regular expression. Based on what you supplied above, this is the most modular approach assuming you want to perform these types of replacements more than once.

function replaceTextAfterAjax(str, regex, matchSendToServer, fn) {
    var matches = regex.exec(str);
    var externUrl = matches[matchSendToServer];
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: externUrl,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "jsonp",
        success: function(json) {
            fn(json.serverSideReplaceText, matches);
        },
    })
}

var text = "go to http://www.example.com";
replaceTextAfterAjax(text, /(go to) (.*)$/, 2, function(response, matches) {
    text = matches[1] + ' ' + response;
    // continue to use `text`
});

Notice that you should be keeping your use of RegExp local by invoking exec on the regular expression instance. This keeps your code thread-safe and prevents other methods from getting another call's RegExp.$N value.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by continue to use text? When I run your code, text does not change. –  Rebecca Blackstone Sep 3 '12 at 18:47
    
The value of text changes above that comment. The comment indicates when you would start using the new value for your application. –  Blake Regalia Sep 3 '12 at 19:16
    
Oh, I see. But I'm getting a syntax error from http://www.iana.org/domains/example/, which is just bizarre. See JSFiddle. –  Rebecca Blackstone Sep 3 '12 at 20:43
add comment

friend, I don't understand your question clearly... you can try this below code... not sure will it work or not...

function example(param, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: param,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "jsonp",
        success: function(data) {
            // do something with data
            if(typeof callback!='undefined'){callback(data)}else{return data};
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try ConversationJS:

https://github.com/rhyneandrew/Conversation.JS

It allows you to make function calls in an entirely new way, essentially binding calls to events rather than making explicit calls. It would allow you to do exactly what you are trying to do in a much more "decoupled" manner, which means that it will also be easy to change and maintain in the future! Remember, nested dependencies are never good!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.