Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Howdy, I have a DataRow pulled out of a DataTable from a DataSet. I am accessing a column that is defined in SQL as a float datatype. I am trying to assign that value to a local variable (c# float datatype) but am getting an InvalidCastExecption

DataRow exercise = _exerciseDataSet.Exercise.FindByExerciseID(65);
_AccelLimit = (float)exercise["DefaultAccelLimit"];

Now, playing around with this I did make it work but it did not make any sense and it didn't feel right.

_AccelLimit = (float)(double)exercise["DefaultAccelLimit"];

Can anyone explain what I am missing here?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 41 down vote accepted

A SQL float is a double according to the documentation for SQLDbType.

share|improve this answer
4  
They are similar but certainly not equivalent. Double supports values of +Infinity, -Infinity, and NaN - as per the IEEE specification, but SQL float most definitely does not. and will throw overflow errors. –  Alain May 24 '12 at 3:57

Ad normally you would never want to use float in SQL Server (or real) if you plan to perform math calculations on the data as it is an inexact datatype and it will introduce calculation errors. Use a decimal datatype instead if you need precision.

share|improve this answer
4  
It is OK for most math and engineering calculations. Now, financial and accounting calculations are, of course, different. –  Constantin Sep 26 '08 at 12:33

The float in Microsoft SQL Server is equivalent to a Double in C#. The reason for this is that a floating-point number can only approximate a decimal number, the precision of a floating-point number determines how accurately that number approximates a decimal number. The Double type represents a double-precision 64-bit floating-point number with values ranging from negative 1.79769313486232e308 to positive 1.79769313486232e308, as well as positive or negative zero, PositiveInfinity, NegativeInfinity, and Not-a-Number (NaN).

share|improve this answer

A float in SQL is a Double in the CLR (C#/VB). There's a table of SQL data types with the CLR equivalents on MSDN.

share|improve this answer
3  
They are similar but certainly not equivalent. Double supports values of +Infinity, -Infinity, and NaN - as per the IEEE specification, but SQL float most definitely does not. and will throw overflow errors. Hopefully MSDN will add this to their info pages. –  Alain May 24 '12 at 4:03
    
Ok. So what's your answer? –  Diwas Pathak Aug 8 at 4:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.