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I found this question here, but this is not the answer i am looking for. Hence, posting again.

A function of the form:

F( N ) = rank

means that Given a number N in decimal representation, its rank is given as:

Starting from 0 to N, how many numbers are there with same number of set bits in its
binary representation.

I will go through an example to make it more clear.

N = 6 ( 0110 )
Its rank is 3.
1. 3 ( 0011 )
2. 5 ( 0101 )
3. 6 ( 0110 )

Now, given a number, find its rank.

The obvious approach is to start from 0 and check for number of set bits for each number till N-1.

The question is:

Is there any logN solution?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a log n solution.

Let n have k bits set, the most significant bit being in position p (starting to count positions from 0, so 2^p <= n < 2^(p+1)). Then there are pCk (binomial coefficient, also choose(p,k)) ways to place k bits in the positions 0, ..., p-1, all these give numbers with exactly k set bits that are smaller than n. If k == 1, that's it, otherwise there remain the numbers with k set bits and the p-th bit set that are smaller than n to consider. Those can be counted by determining the rank of n - 2^p.

Code (not optimal, does some unnecessary recomputation, and doesn't all that it could do to avoid overflow):

unsigned long long binom(unsigned n, unsigned k) {
    if (k == 0 || n == k) return 1;
    if (n < k) return 0;
    if (k > (n >> 1)) k = n-k;
    unsigned long long res = n, j;
    // We're not doing all we can to avoid overflow, as this is a proof of concept,
    // not production code.
    for(j = 2; j <= k; ++j) {
        res *= (n+1-j);
        res /= j;
    }
    return res;
}

unsigned popcount(unsigned long long n) {
    unsigned k = 0;
    while(n) {
        ++k;
        n &= (n-1);
    }
    return k;
}

unsigned long long rank(unsigned long long n) {
    if (n == 0) return 1;
    unsigned p = 0, k = popcount(n);
    unsigned long long mask = 1,h = n >> 1;
    while(h > 0) {
        ++p;
        h >>= 1;
    }
    mask <<= p;
    unsigned long long r = binom(p,k);
    r += rank(n-mask);
    return r;
}

Tested in a loop for 0 <= n < 10^8 to check for mistakes without any mismatch found.

Check output here.

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1  
For reference, pCk refers to the binomial coefficient. –  huon-dbaupp Sep 3 '12 at 18:35
    
The approach looks fine. But, did you check for N = 5 & N = 6? It fails here. –  Green goblin Sep 3 '12 at 18:39
1  
@Aashish I haven't done all the details yet, give me a couple of minutes to write some code ;) –  Daniel Fischer Sep 3 '12 at 18:43
1  
@DanielFischer: [puts on OEIS Editor hat] If you do work out the details, you could add it as a comment to A068076; I'll review it myself. –  DSM Sep 3 '12 at 18:46
    
@DSM Details worked out, A068076 is rank(n)-1. But how do I add a comment on OEIS? Would I have to register there? –  Daniel Fischer Sep 3 '12 at 19:20

Here is a rather efficient O(logN) implementation that performs multiple additions in parallel per step:

unsigned int countBits( unsigned int bits )
{
    bits = ( bits & 0x55555555 ) + ( ( bits >> 1 ) & 0x55555555 );
    bits = ( bits & 0x33333333 ) + ( ( bits >> 2 ) & 0x33333333 );
    bits = ( bits + ( bits >>  4 ) ) & 0x0f0f0f0f;
    bits += bits >>  8;
    return ( bits + ( bits >> 16 ) ) & 63;
}

It starts with 16 2-bit additions, then makes 8 4-bit additions and so on. It can be extended to work with 64-bit integers by using longer masks and one additional step:

unsigned int countBits( unsigned long long bits )
{
    bits = ( bits & 0x5555555555555555L ) + ( ( bits >> 1 ) & 0x5555555555555555LL );
    bits = ( bits & 0x3333333333333333L ) + ( ( bits >> 2 ) & 0x3333333333333333LL );
    bits = ( bits + ( bits >>  4 ) ) & 0x0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0fLL;
    bits += bits >>  8;
    bits += bits >> 16;
    return (unsigned int) ( bits + ( bits >> 32 ) ) & 127;
}
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It can be solved by combination and permutation techniques.

F(N) = rank

First find number of bits that are required to represent N. In binary representation, number can be constructed as follows:

N = cn 2^n + .... + c3 2^2 + c2 2^1 + c1 2^0

Now, in order to find n (or numbers of bits in binary representation of a number) in above equation, we can assume that it will be floor(log2(N)) + 1. For example, consider any number, let say 118 then it can be represented by floor(log2(118)) + 1 = 7 bits.

n = floor(log2(118)) + 1;

Above formula is only O(1). Now, we need to find how many 1s are there in binary representation of a number. Considering a pseudo-code to do this job:

function count1(int N) {
    int c = 0;
    int N' = N;

    while(N' > 0) {
       N' -= 2^(floor(log2(N')));
       c++;
    }
}

Above pseudo-code is O(logN). I wrote small script in MATLAB to test my above pseudo-code and here are the results.

count1(6)   = 2
count1(3)   = 2
count1(118) = 5

Perfect, now we have number of bits and number of 1s in those bits. Now, simple combination and permutation can be applied to find the rank of number. first lets assume, n is number of bits required to represent a number and c is number of 1s in the bit representation of a number. Therefore, rank would be given by:

r = n ! / c ! * (n - c) ! 

EDIT: As suggested by DSM, I've corrected the logic to find the correct RANK. Idea is to remove all the unwanted numbers from the permutation. So added this code:

for i = N + 1 : 2^n - 1
    if count(i) == c
       r = r - 1;
    end
end

I've written a MATLAb script to find rank of a number using above method:

function r = rankN(N)

n = floor(log2(N)) + 1;
c = count(N);
r = factorial(n) / (factorial(c) * factorial(n - c));
% rejecting all the numbers may have included in the permutations 
% but are unnecessary.
for i = N + 1 : 2^n - 1
    if count(i) == c
       r = r - 1;
    end
end

function c = count(n)

c = 0;
N = n;
while N > 0
    N = N - 2^(floor(log2(N)));
    c = c + 1;
end

And above alogrithm is O(1) + O(logN) + O(1) = O(logN). The output is:

>> rankN(3)

ans =

     1

>> rankN(4)

ans =

     3

>> rankN(7)

ans =

     1

>> rankN(118)

ans =

    18

>> rankN(6)

ans =

     3

Note: Rank of 0 is always 1 because above method will fail for 0 as log2(0) is undefined.

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How can rankN(3) be 2? It's 11 in binary; the only number <= 3 with 2 bits is 3 itself. I would think 3,4,7, 118 would have ranks of 1,3,1,18. –  DSM Sep 3 '12 at 19:46
    
Yeah, there was some mistakes in my script, but output now is coming out to be [1, 3, 1, 21] –  User 104 Sep 3 '12 at 19:52
    
I'm pretty sure rank(118) is only 18. I think you're counting numbers with the same number of bits as 118 from 119-128 too. –  DSM Sep 3 '12 at 20:00
    
Binary representation of 118 is 1110110 7 bits and it contains 5 - 1s and 2 - 0s, so 7 ! / 5 ! * 2 ! = 21 which matches with my script. Now, problem is narrowed down to whether my permutation formula is correct or not? What do you think? –  User 104 Sep 3 '12 at 20:04
    
You're forgetting that 1111001, 1111010, and 1111100 are valid permutations, but invalid numbers, because they're all larger than 118. That's why you get 21 when the answer is 18. –  DSM Sep 3 '12 at 20:08

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