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I got the following code (do not argue about whether it is meaningful, it is just a minimal example):

struct X{
    template <typename T>
    T foo(){ return T(); }
};

template <typename T>
struct Z{
    virtual X bar(){
        bar().foo<int>();
        return X();
    }
};

It does not compile on my g++4.6.3. The line bar().foo<int>(); gives the following error:

error: expected primary-expression before ‘int’
error: expected ‘;’ before ‘int’

when I first save the result of bar() in a local variable, then it works, i.e. if I replace bar().foo<int>() by

        X x = bar();
        x.foo<int>(); 

then it works. If i now declare the local variable auto instead of X, i.e.:

        auto x = bar();
        x.foo<int>();

then I receive the same error as before. If I remove the type parameter from class Z (i.e. make it a usual instead of a template class), then it works again.

If I use a classtype like X instead of int as type parameter for foo, i.e. foo<X>, then I receive the following error instead:

expected primary-expression before ‘>’ token
expected primary-expression before ‘)’ token

I am really unable to spot the error here. Please help!

share|improve this question
    
The code compiler fine in visual studio. In your case I believe gcc has bug :) –  Mr.Anubis Sep 3 '12 at 18:45
    
@Mr.Anubis, Comeau C/C++ seems to also compile the original version fine. I, too, think this might just be a bug in GCC. –  eq- Sep 3 '12 at 19:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to qualify that the type in question is templatable (this is a work-around for what I think is a bug in GCC, see edit below), i.e.

struct X{
    template <typename T>
    T foo(){ return T(); }
};

template <typename T>
struct Z{
    virtual X bar(){
        bar().template foo<int>();
        return X();
    }
};

The basic issue has to do with parsing, because explicit template instantiations could be parsed in a number of ways. The interesting bit (I think) is located in 14.2p4, and it is as follows:

When the name of a member template specialization appears after . or -> in a postfix-expression or after a nested-name-specifier in a qualified-id, and the object or pointer expression of the postfix-expression or the nested-name-specifier in the qualified-id depends on a template parameter (14.6.2) but does not refer to a member of the current instantiation (14.6.2.1), the member template name must be prefixed by the keyword template. Otherwise the name is assumed to name a non-template.

If I'm not gravely mistaken, Z<T>::bar does depend on a template parameter, but at the same time it does refer to the current instantiation, thus I'm inclined to believe that the standard does not require a qualification like GCC does. When multiple compilers have conflicting results, I tend to side with Comeau, which in this case says that the template qualifier is not necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
what, why? I have never seen this syntax. In which cases do I have to use it? And why does it result in such strange behaviour when used with auto? And why does it work if I remove the type parameter from Z. Z is not involved here at all! Do you have a link to a tutorial that explains all that stuff? –  gexicide Sep 3 '12 at 18:28
    
isn't that line bar().template foo<int>(); inside bar member fn is endless recursion? (though it compiles) or my eyes are popping for nothing? –  Mr.Anubis Sep 3 '12 at 18:34
    
@Mr.Anubis, yes. It's not invalid code, though. –  eq- Sep 3 '12 at 18:35
    
@Mr.Anubis, it might be a compiler bug as you noted. I need to look up a thing or two before shifting the blame, though. –  eq- Sep 3 '12 at 18:52

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