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I hate inner class.

I've a main activity who launches a 'short-life' AsyncTask.

AsyncTask is in a separate file, is not an inner class of main activity

I need async task updates a textView from main Activity.

I know i can update a TextView from onProgressUpdate, if AsyncTask is a inner class

But how from an external, indipendent, async task ?

UPDATE: This looks like working :

In acitivty i call the task

backgroundTask = new BackgroundTask(this);
backgroundTask.execute();

In the constructor i've

public BackgroundTask(Activity myContext)
{
    debug = (TextView) myContext.findViewById(R.id.debugText);
}

where debug was a private field of AsyncTask.

So onProgressUpdate I can

debug.append(text);

Thanks for all of you suggestions

share|improve this question
    
You means that in another class, you want to access UI ? –  Hossein Mobasher Sep 3 '12 at 18:39
    
Yes. I need to update a TextView from the AsyncTask. –  realtebo Sep 3 '12 at 18:50
    
You can pass Context in your constructor and with casting it to your ActivityClass, you can change textView using runOnUIThread method. –  Hossein Mobasher Sep 3 '12 at 19:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

AsyncTask is always separate class from Activity, but I suspect you mean it is in different file than your activity class file, so you cannot benefit from being activity's inner class. Simply pass Activity context as argument to your Async Task (i.e. to its constructor)

class MyAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<URL, Integer, Long> {

    Activity mActivity;

    public MyAsyncTask(Activity activity) {
       mActivity = ativity;
    }

 ...

and use when you need it (remember to not use in during doInBackground()) i.e. so when you would normally call

int id = findViewById(...)

in Async Task you call i.e.

int id = mActivity.findViewById(...);

where mActivity is passed activity. Please note you need to declare it as Activity mActivity, not just Context mActivity.

share|improve this answer
    
If you go this route, it's better to hold the activity reference as a WeakReference<Activity> instead of just Activity. IMO. –  newbyca Sep 3 '12 at 18:57
    
I do not think so, as AsyncTask is bond to Activity lifecycle, however there's might be other type of problem on orientation change (but we do not know if OP's activity is not fixed-orientation). –  Marcin Orlowski Sep 3 '12 at 19:00
    
What is "WeakReference" ?! –  realtebo Sep 3 '12 at 19:01
    
WebnetMobile.com, ah ok, I wasn't sure, good to know. @realtebo, developer.android.com/reference/java/lang/ref/… –  newbyca Sep 3 '12 at 19:03

Just pass the context (activity or whatever) to your AsyncTask in a constructor and then in onSuccess or onProgressUpdate call whatever you need on the context.

share|improve this answer

Make an static function in your activity class passing context in it to update your text view and then call this function in your AsynkTask class to update.

In Activity class: public static void updateTextView(){

//your code here }

In AynckTask class call this function.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect. Thanks! –  hoss Aug 11 '13 at 3:18

I wrote a small extension to AsyncTask for this kind of scenario. It allows you to keep your AsyncTask in a separate class, but also gives you convenient access to the Tasks's completion:

public abstract class ListenableAsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result> extends AsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result>{

    @Override
    protected final void onPostExecute(Result result) {
        notifyListenerOnPostExecute(result);
    }

    private AsyncTaskListener<Result> mListener;
    public interface AsyncTaskListener<Result>{
        public void onPostExecute(Result result);
    }
    public void listenWith(AsyncTaskListener<Result> l){
        mListener = l;
    }
    private void notifyListenerOnPostExecute(Result result){
        if(mListener != null)
            mListener.onPostExecute(result);
    }

}

So first you extend ListenableAsyncTask instead of AsyncTask. Then in your UI code, make a concrete instance and set listenWith(...).

share|improve this answer

The Question has already been answered, still im posting how it should be done i guess..

Mainactivity class

  public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener
    {

        TextView Ctemp;

        @Override
        protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
        {
            super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
            setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
            Ctemp = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.Ctemp);
            doConv = (Button) findViewById(R.id.doConv);
            doConv.setOnClickListener(this);
        }

        @Override
        public void onClick(View arg0) // The conversion to do
        {
            new asyncConvert(this).execute();
        }
    }

now in the async class

public class asyncConvert extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String>
{
    SoapPrimitive response = null;
    Context context;

    public asyncConvert(Context callerclass)
    {
        contextGUI = callerclass;
    }
.
.
.
.
protected void onPostExecute(String result)
    {
        ((MainActivity) contextGUI).Ctemp.setText(result); // changing TextView
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Using Interface 1) Create one Interface

public interface OnDataSendToActivity {
    public void sendData(String str);
}

2) Implements it in your Activity

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnDataSendToActivity{

     @Override
     protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
          new AsyncTest(this).execute(new String[]{"AnyData"}); // start your task
     }

     @Override
     public void sendData(String str) {
         // TODO Auto-generated method stub

     }

}

3) Create constructor in AsyncTask(Activity activity){} Register your Interface in AsyncTask file and call interface method as below.

public class AsyncTest extends AsyncTask<String, Integer, String> {

    OnDataSendToActivity dataSendToActivity;
    public AsyncTest(Activity activity){
        dataSendToActivity = (OnDataSendToActivity)activity;
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
        super.onPostExecute(result);
        dataSendToActivity.sendData(result);
    }

}

Here, your OnPostExecute will call after all task done by AsyncTask and will get "result" as a parameter, returned by doInBackground(){ return "";}.

While "dataSendToActivity.sendData(result);" it will call activity's overrided method "public void sendData(String str) {}".

share|improve this answer
    /**
     * Background Async Task to Load all product by making HTTP Request
     * */
     public  static class updateTExtviewAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<String, String, String> {

        Context context;
        ProgressDialog pDialog;
        String id, name;

        String state_id;

        //--- Constructor for getting network id from asking method

        public  updateTExtviewAsyncTask(Context context,String id,String city) 
        {
            context   = context;
            state_id  = id;
            city_name = city;
        }       
        /* *
         * Before starting background thread Show Progress Dialog
         * */
        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute() 
        {
            super.onPreExecute();
            pDialog = ProgressDialog.show(context, "","Please wait...", true, true);
            pDialog.show();

        }

        /**
         * getting All products from url
         * */
        protected String doInBackground(String... args) 
        {
            return null;
        }

        /**
         * After completing background task Dismiss the progress dialog
         * **/
            protected void onPostExecute(String file_url)  {

                     YourClass.UpdateTextViewData("Textview data");
        }
    }

// place this code inside your activity class and also declare updating textview static

    public static void  UpdateTextViewData(String tvData) 
{
   tv.setText(tvData);
}
share|improve this answer

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