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If I want to set my property in a Class private, so it should be only possible to use and set this property in this class, what is the better way? This

public string Name { private get; private set }

or

private string Name { get; set }

hmmm and there is also

private string Name { private get; private set }
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Do you want to set the property to private variable of class? –  Kundan Singh Chouhan Sep 3 '12 at 18:56
    
@KundanSinghChouhan Yes I think so... not sure I get it what you want ^^ –  silla Sep 3 '12 at 18:56
    
@Sila i have added my answer. Have a look. –  Kundan Singh Chouhan Sep 3 '12 at 18:59
1  
Please try to compile first. The question about which one is "better" will follow after the question of which one is "compileable" in the first place. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 3 '12 at 19:06
1  
All of the examples miss a semicolon ; after the set. But even with that, only the second one is legal (see my answer). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 3 '12 at 19:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you tried compiling your examples? Only the middle one will translate.

If you want to specify extra accessibility level keyword, you can only do it on one of the accessors (getter/setter), and that level of the accessor must be more restrictive than the accessibility of the entire property.

Here you see the rules: Restricting Accessor Accessibility

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yeah you are right. Somehow I cannot compile if if use private get; private set only if I use private for get OR for set –  silla Sep 3 '12 at 19:05

It's worth noting that originally, C# wouldn't let you set different accesses on a getter or setter, so the only possible choices were:

public string Name { get; set; }
protected internal string Name { get; set; }
internal string Name { get; set; }
protected string Name { get; set; }
private string Name { get; set; }

(For that matter, you couldn't have automatic properties and always had to do the writing to and from a backing field yourself, but we'll ignore that just because we'll have shorter examples that way).

It is often useful to have different accesses for the two, most often a more restrictive setter than getter, and so the likes of

public string Name { get; private set; }

was introduced.

Now, by extension of that, it would seem logical enough to allow:

public string Name { private get; private set; }
private string Name { private get; private set; }

However, what are these two expressing?

The second isn't too bad, it's just needlessly repetitious. Still though, it's quite likely that some confused thinking got us there (most likely an incomplete refactoring). Good code is as much about expressing what you are doing as making a computer do something (if anything, more so), better to have it express clearly.

Hence if you end up with the likes of { private get; private set; } then it'd likely be worth looking at again and thinking about what you really want to say here. Hurrah for it being a compiler error.

Th first case is even worse. It says "this property is public, except for the setter that is private, and the getter that is private". That's not an exception, "it's this thing, except for all the time" is no real expression of anything. Doubly hurrah the compiler for not letting us do it.

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Just to be pedantic: Without specifying different access on a getter or setter, there's a fifth possibility: protected internal string Name { get; set; } –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 8 '12 at 9:11
    
@JeppeStigNielsen Yep. I'd half a notion that protected internal wasn't in C#1.0 and came in later, but a quick search seems to suggest it was always there. –  Jon Hanna Sep 8 '12 at 10:19
    
The internal one is now accidentally private. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 8 '12 at 10:29
    
@JeppeStigNielsen lol. Sometimes one should just leave well alone. –  Jon Hanna Sep 8 '12 at 12:42

The better way depends on what you want:

public string Name { private get; private set } The property is public but noone can read or wrote to it, except class itself. That is completely useless, so use just private string Name { get; set }.

In general if you view the property like a couple of methods (which actually is)

private string get_Name() {  }

private string set_Name(value) {  }

The reason of having a possibility to apply that identifiers to a property get/set becomes evident, I hope.

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@downvoter: care to explain ? –  Tigran Sep 4 '12 at 7:02
    
FYI, I'm not the downvoter. I think you mean private void set_Name(string value) { }. –  Hand-E-Food Sep 8 '12 at 11:17
public string Name { get; private set; }

This is what I think you are wanting to do.

There is no point trying to make the get private when the property is public unless you only want your class to see it. In that situation you should use:

private string Name { get; set; }

Update: On second read, you definitely want the second example.

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If you really want what you are asking, then you don't need a property, you should use a private field.

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