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This is a weird one. I'm working inside a PHP theme file in WordPress.

$a = false;
$b = true;

$c = $a OR $b;

$c is false

But

$c = $a || $b;

$c is, correctly, true.

I can create a function

function checkor($a, $b)
{
  return $a OR $b;
}

And this will correctly return true for the values above.

Any idea why the php OR operand doesn't appear to work in a WordPress theme template file? (I'm running MAMP Pro on a Mac, PHP version 5.2.13.)

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with Wordpress, and is actually the way PHP works.
It's called Operator Precedence.

To quote the PHP docs:

// "||" has a greater precedence than "or"

// The result of the expression (false || true) is assigned to $e
// Acts like: ($e = (false || true))
$e = false || true;

// The constant false is assigned to $f and then true is ignored
// Acts like: (($f = false) or true)
$f = false or true;
share|improve this answer
    
So the equals assignment is getting precedence over the OR operator? The reason that the function works is that it's returning the result? Your answer is obviously correct, but it's certainly a surprising result to me. – Christopher Werby Sep 3 '12 at 20:15
    
That Viper link is very cool! – Christopher Werby Sep 3 '12 at 20:25
    
@ChristopherWerby - If you really want to use the literal AND & OR operators, just wrap 'em in parenthesis. – Joseph Silber Sep 3 '12 at 20:27

Check the PHP manual http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.operators.logical.php

// "||" has a greater precedence than "or"

// The result of the expression (false || true) is assigned to $e
// Acts like: ($e = (false || true))
$e = false || true;

// The constant false is assigned to $f and then true is ignored
// Acts like: (($f = false) or true)
$f = false or true;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I get it -- the equals assignment operator is evaluated first -- but that result certainly surprises me. Seems like || and OR should be equivalent. I also note that AND is similarly "flawed". I prefer AND and OR for readability. But I'll have to stop using them. – Christopher Werby Sep 3 '12 at 20:20

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