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For a project we were given a game engine off which to create a game. We, as part of this, have to implement pixel level collision detection after a possible collision has been found via a bounding box detection method. I have implemented both but my pixel level test fails for small objects (bullets in this case). I have checked if it works for slow bullets but that fails too.

For my pixel level implementation I create bitmasks for each texture using an the available IntBuffer (a ByteBuffer is available too?). The IntBuffer is in RGBA format and its size is width*height, I placed this in a 2D array and replaced all non-zero numbers with 1's to create the mask. After a collision of bounding boxes I find the rectangle represented by the overlap (using .createIntersection) and then check the maps of both sprites within this intersection for a nonzero pixel from both using bitwise AND.

Here is my code for the pixel level test:

/**
 * Pixel level test
 *
 * @param rect the rectangle representing the intersection of the bounding
 * boxes
 * @param index1 the index at which the first objects texture is stored
 * @param index the index at which the second objects texture is stored
 */
public static boolean isBitCollision(Rectangle2D rect, int index1, int index2)
{
    int height = (int) rect.getHeight();
    int width = (int) rect.getWidth();

    long mask1 = 0;
    long mask2 = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < width; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < height; j++)
        {
            mask1 = mask1 + bitmaskArr[index1].bitmask[i][j];//add up the current column of "pixels"
            mask2 = mask2 + bitmaskArr[index2].bitmask[i][j];

            if (((mask1) & (mask2)) != 0)//bitwise and, if both are nonzero there is a collsion
            {
                return true;
            }
            mask1 = 0;
            mask2 = 0;
        }

    }


    return false;
}

I've been struggling with this for days and any help will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
from file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/ser/Desktop/java3d/Shoelace%20formula%20-‌​%20Wikipedia,%20the%20free%20encyclopedia.htm you can find area of one of the shapes........ If area of union-of-them is smaller than sum of areas of distinct shapes, then they are colliding. This is O(n+m) way better than O(n*n) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 3 '12 at 21:00
    
Thanks for the advice but I have to implement this sort of testing. –  Mafro34 Sep 3 '12 at 21:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I managed to solve my own issue and now it works properly. For anyone interested what I did was find the rectangle created by the overlap of the two bounding boxes of the two sprites. I then dropped each object to the origin along with it, relatively, the rectangle of intersection. It should be noted that I dropped each object to a "separate" origin - ie I effectively had two rectangle of intersection afterwards - one for each. The co-ordinates of each rectangle of intersection, now in bounds of the bitmask 2D arrays for both objects, were used to check the correct regions for overlap of both objects:

I loop bottom to top left to right through the bitmask as the image data provided in upside - apparently this is the norm for image data.

 /**
 * My Pixel level test - 2D
 *
 * @param rect the rectangle representing the intersection of the bounding
 * boxes
 * @param index1 the index at which the first objects texture is stored
 * @param index2 the index at which the second objects texture is stored
 * @param p1 the position of object 1
 * @param p2 the position of object 2
 * @return true if there is a collision at a pixel level false if not
 */
//public static boolean isPixelCollision(Rectangle2D rect, Point2D.Float p1, Bitmask bm1, Point2D.Float p2, Bitmask bm2)
public static boolean isPixelCollision(Rectangle2D rect, Point2D.Float p1, int index1, Point2D.Float p2, int index2)
{
    int height = (int) rect.getHeight();
    int width = (int) rect.getWidth();

    byte mask1 = 0;
    byte mask2 = 0;

    //drop both objects to the origin and drop a rectangle of intersection for each along with them
    //this allows for us to have the co-ords of the rect on intersection within them at number that are inbounds.
    Point2D.Float origP1 = new Point2D.Float((float) Math.abs(rect.getX() - p1.x), (float) Math.abs(rect.getY() - p1.y));//rect for object one
    Point2D.Float origP2 = new Point2D.Float((float) Math.abs(rect.getX() - p2.x), (float) Math.abs(rect.getY() - p2.y));//rect for object two

    //to avoid casting with every iteration
    int start1y = (int) origP1.y;
    int start1x = (int) origP1.x;
    int start2y = (int) origP2.y;
    int start2x = (int) origP2.x;

    //we need to loop within the rect of intersection
    //goind bottom up and left to right
    for (int i = height - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++)
        {
            mask1 = bitmaskArr[index1].bitmask[start1y + i][start1x + j];
            mask2 = bitmaskArr[index2].bitmask[start2y + i][start2x + j];
            if ((mask1 & mask2) > 0)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

    }
    //no collsion was found
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

The problem could be with this part of the code:

if (((mask1) & (mask2)) != 0)//bitwise and, if both are nonzero there is a collsion
{
    return true;
}

you seem to be using a bitwise and for checking whether both values are non zero - but this may not work in such a manner.

For instance the value of the following expression:

3 & 4 == 0

is true

This is because when you do a bitwise operation you need to think of the numbers as their bit representation and do the operation bit-by-bit.

So:

  3 = 0000 0011
& 4 = 0000 0100
---------------
  0 = 0000 0000

this is because of how the 1 bit values align to one another. For a bit in a bitwise and to have the value of 1 - two bits at the same location in the different numbers need to be 1.

Another example would be:

  3 = 0000 0011
& 2 = 0000 0010
---------------
  2 = 0000 0010

So in your case a better check would be:

if ( mask1>0 && mask2>0 )//logical and if both are nonzero there is a collsion
{
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
While I marvel at my own stupidity changing the code as advised unfortunately does not fix the problem. I also tried implementing a shift as this seamed like it could sort out the problems you brought up by doing so: int shift = (int) (p1.x -p2.x) then: if (shift<0) { mask1 = mask1 << (-shift); }else { mask2 = mask2 << (shift); } if ((mask1 & mask2) != 0) { return true; } –  Mafro34 Sep 4 '12 at 11:57
    
@Mafro34 how is the bitmask implemented? Let's say we have two bullets that are 2x2 pixels. In this example I think the bitmasks should be 3x3 rectangles. Is this how you have it? –  norbitheeviljester Sep 4 '12 at 13:07
    
If bullets are 2 in height and 2 in width then the mask in this case would be 2x2 as well. –  Mafro34 Sep 4 '12 at 17:28
    
aha. how big are the bullets you're testing with? If the collision box is as big as the bullets then it's possible that the bullets go through each other. Let's say we have bullets that are 1x1. They move 1 tile each turn towards each other and they're 4 tiles apart. In the next move they're 2 tiles apart, in the next they're right next to each other, but because of the boundary mask being the size of bullets there's still no collision. The next turn they swap places and still no collision took place! Is this a possible scenario? –  norbitheeviljester Sep 4 '12 at 20:35
    
The bullets I am using are 6x6 and the things the collide with are 64x64.I did in fact consider the scenario you have posed :) and checked my collision testing with game frames per second (refresh rate of the game) at very high numbers so to combat this and alas still failure. I believe the problem lies in that my loop counters always start at 0 and thus only the bitmasks are only checked from the top however far down each time rather than having the loop start at a point within rather. I have no idea how to combat this though :( –  Mafro34 Sep 4 '12 at 21:05

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