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I'm trying to parse some HTML content with html5lib using the lxml treebuilder. Note: I'm using the requests library to grab the content and the content is HTML5 (tried with XHTML - same result).

When I simply output the HTML source, it looks alright:

response = requests.get(url)
return response.text

returns

<html xmlns:foo="http://www.example.com/ns/foo">

But when I'm actually parsing it with the html5lib, something odd happens:

tree = html5lib.parse(response.text, treebuilder = 'lxml', namespaceHTMLElements = True)
html = tree.getroot()
return lxml.etree.tostring(html, pretty_print = False)

returns

<html:html xmlns:html="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlnsU0003Afoo="http://www.example.com/ns/foo">

Note the xmlnsU0003Afoo thing.

Also, the html.nsmap dict does not contain the foo namespace, only html.

Does anyone have an idea about what's going on and how I could fix this?

Later edit:

It seems that this is expected behavior:

If the XML API being used restricts the allowable characters in the local names of elements and attributes, then the tool may map all element and attribute local names [...] to a set of names that are allowed, by replacing any character that isn't supported with the uppercase letter U and the six digits of the character's Unicode code [...] - Coercing an HTML DOM into an infoset

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can you provide an example url? –  Peter Hoffmann Sep 3 '12 at 21:31
    
Currently I'm using sample data that I created on my local webserver. But it should be obvious from the example output. It's just an HTML document with custom namespaces. –  Alexei Sep 3 '12 at 22:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A few observations:

  • HTML5 doesn't seem to support xmlns attributes. Quoting section 1.6 of the latest HTML5 specification: "...namespaces cannot be represented using the HTML syntax, but they are supported in the DOM and in the XHTML syntax." I see you tried with XHTML as well, but you're currently using HTML5, so there could be an issue there. U+003A is the Unicode for colon, so somehow the xmlns is being noted but flubbed.

  • There is an open issue with custom namespace elements for at least the PHP version.

  • I don't understand the role of html5lib here. Why not just use lxml directly:

from lxml import etree

tree = etree.fromstring(resp_text)
print etree.tostring(tree, pretty_print=True)

That seems to do what you want, without html5lib and without the goofy xmlnsU0003Afoo error. With the test HTML I used, I got the right output (follows), and tree.nsmap contained an entry for 'foo'.

<html xmlns:foo="http://www.example.com/ns/foo">
    <head>
        <title>yo</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>test</p>
    </body>
</html>

Alternatively, if you wish to use pure html5lib, you can just use the included simpletree:

tree = html5lib.parse(resp_text, namespaceHTMLElements=True)
print tree.toxml()

While this doesn't muck up the xmlns attribute, simpletree unfortunately lacks the more powerful ElementTree functions like xpath().

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1. The problem here is not whether HTML5 supports xmlns or not. The problem is the library doesn't seem to parse the attribute correctly, regardless of it's meaning, i.e. I can't even do: html.attrib['xmlns:foo'] but insead I have to do: html.attrib['xmlnsU0003Afoo'] (well, since I have to act like I don't know the prefix, I'll have to loop over each attribute and see if it starts with xmlnsU0003A) I find it strange, really. –  Alexei Sep 3 '12 at 22:43
    
2. I'm using html5lib for 2 reasons: one of them is that currently I'm just fooling around, learning the Python language and other cool stuff. The second one is eventually the app I'm building has to be able to work with real pages on the web and I want it to see them the way browsers see them (and, as a result, the way developers see them, that's the whole point). –  Alexei Sep 3 '12 at 22:46
    
3. I did see that thread in their issues list regarding the PHP port. That and a chat log are the only things I could find (the chat log was pointless, someone was saying that the html5lib is broken in regard to namespaces). I thought I'd ask people on SO before filing an issue, maybe I'm doing something wrong. –  Alexei Sep 3 '12 at 22:49
    
But anyway, my interest is to move forward with the project so I'll switch to the HTML parser included in lxml for now. I will file an issue tomorrow morning on the html5lib website and see what they are saying. Thanks for your answer! –  Alexei Sep 3 '12 at 23:09
2  
Apparently that's expected behavior: "If the XML API being used restricts the allowable characters in the local names of elements and attributes, then the tool may map all element and attribute local names [...] to a set of names that are allowed, by replacing any character that isn't supported with the uppercase letter U and the six digits of the character's Unicode code [...]" See Coercing an HTML DOM into an infoset –  Alexei Sep 4 '12 at 15:51

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