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I'm simply trying to get an Int value that's associated with a String key. I get:

error: type mismatch;
found   : Char
required: String
    score += tiles(letter)

from my code here:

val tiles = Map[String, Int](
    "a" -> 1,
    "b" -> 3,
    "c" -> 3,
    "d" -> 2
    // etc.
)

def main(args: Array[String]) {
    println("\nScrabble Calculator 1.0")
    println("Enter words on the commandline.")
    println("Use a '_' character for blank tiles.\n")

    for (w <- args)  // loop through each word
        if (w.length < 2)
            println(w + ": one-letter words disallowed in Scrabble")
        else
            calculate(w)
}

def calculate(w: String) {
    var score = 0
    for (letter <- w)
        score += tiles(letter)
    println(w + ": " + score + " points")
}

If I do "a" or "b" instead of letter, it works fine (it returns 1, or 3, or whatever).

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2  
Won't this be a bit useless without taking into account bonus squares etc? Anyway, I made this more functional for you: gist.github.com/3615319 –  Luigi Plinge Sep 4 '12 at 0:43
    
Awesome code. Not sure I understand it, but it's definitely 100x more elegant than mine. And yeah, I would have had to deal with score multipliers eventually. This was just a quick project to learn some Scala syntax. –  Aaron Sep 5 '12 at 0:11

2 Answers 2

tiles is a Map[String, Int].

calculate takes a String argument, w. It pulls individual characters out of w into letter, so letter is of type Char.

You then try to look up letter in tiles. letter is a Char, when tiles needs a String. This is precisely what the compiler is telling you with that error message.

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Oh, jeez. It was a simple syntax problem. If you use ' instead of ", it is interpreted as a Char:

val tiles = Map[Char, Int](
    'a' -> 1,
    'b' -> 3,
    'c' -> 3,
    'd' -> 2,
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, that's the way it works in C, C++, C#, Haskell, Java, OCaml and probably many other languages as well. –  DaoWen Sep 4 '12 at 13:11

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