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It's often the case that I write a class, along with helper functions that are intimately connected to that class. For my current, a Window class to wrap some win32api calls, along with functions to, say, find windows. Should those helper functions be globals in the given module, or should they be class methods of the Window class. That is, should I have, in my module:

class Window(object):
    def __init__(self, handle): 
        self.handle = handle
        ...
    ...
    @classmethod
    def find_windows(cls, params):
        handles = ...
        return map(cls, handles)

with the usage being:

from window import Window
windows = Window.find_windows("Specialty")

or should I do:

class Window(object):
    def __init__(self, handle): 
        self.handle = handle
        ...
    ...

def find_windows(params):
    handles = ...
    return map(Window, handles)

with the usage being:

from window import Window, find_windows
windows = find_windows("Speciality")

Put more succinctly: should the grouping be at the class-level (e.g. they would be static methods in Java) or at the module level?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first approach has the advantage that in case you subclass Window you can override yourfind_windows method (unlike static methods in java). However, this would only be useful if overriding would eventually make sense, otherwise I think it looks nicer having it as a function.

Edit: If you have multiple ways of finding Window objects, it would make sense to have an additonal class called WindowFinder or WindowManager which encapsulates query/finding logic.

This is a pattern used in django where if your Window class is let's say a db model, you than have Window.objects pointing to a WindowManager. The window manager has methods for building sql queries.

Then, you can do things like:

Window.objects.all()

or

Window.objects.filter(name="Speciality")
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ah i think the separate 'finder' class is actually what i'm looking to do; thanks for reminding me of django's ways –  Claudiu Sep 3 '12 at 23:41

If I understand correctly, your find_windows function creates a list of Window instances from a list of handles.

It behaves a constructor, therefore, I would make it a function and not a classmethod of the Window class. As I mentioned in a comment, it feels more natural that way, but it's just a hunch.

EDIT

@Ioan Alexandru Cucu 's answer made me ponder the case where you subclass your Window as, say, a SubWindow. If find_windows (or as suggested create_windows) is a classmethod, it will return a list of SubWindow instances, whereas it would only returns Window instances if it were an independent function as I suggested.

This can be considered as an interesting feature, and it would then make sense to keep find_windows as a classmethod. I would still put some kind of comment explaining the rationale in the docstring or elsewhere.

<tl;dr>: that depends.

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Can you expand on that rationale? Why does it being a constructor mean it should be a function and not a class method? –  Claudiu Sep 3 '12 at 21:53
    
In practice, it doesn't really matter whether find_window is a function or a class method, the result is the same. On an OO point of view, I'm not comfortable with a method of a class returning new instances of the class. Alas, it's just a hunch (I've no formal training in OOP theory)... –  Pierre GM Sep 3 '12 at 21:59
    
Calling a method find_windows doesn't sound like construction is involved. I would name that create_windows. find_windows sounds like a method/function that searches through a pool of windows/database or anything. –  Ioan Alexandru Cucu Sep 3 '12 at 22:04

If find_windows() doesn't need access or knowledge of the inner workings of your Window class I would just make it a global function. There's little to be gained by increasing the dependencies between separate pieces of code, especially when it basically just an issue of where the source is located.

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