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I'm trying to have it so that multiple objects on a canvas in Tkinter can be resized/repositioned using a spinbox, with the value in the spinbox being used as a multiplier to the original coordinates. To make matters slightly more complicated, the spinbox is not visible by default, it's in a Toplevel window that can be opened when a button is pressed.

To summarise:
I need to alter the coordinates of objects on a canvas using a spinbox value as a multiplier (or otherwise) which itself is in a Toplevel window, and have these alterations displayed in 'real time' on the canvas.

For context, I've included the key peripheral code responsible for setting up the objects etc.

Essential Parts of UI module:


import Canvas_1 (module for drawing shapes)

root=Tk()

#root geometry, title set up
#UI then commands set up
canvasBlank=Canvas(root, width... etc) #Blank canvas that is drawn at start
canvasBlank.grid(row... etc)
canvasBlank.bind('Button-3', rightclickcanvas) #Right click function that opens a popup for canvas options
#Other misc commands, I'm using a menubar with drop down options over actual Tk.Buttons
#'New' option in menubar has Command to create objects in UI like:

def createObject():
     Objects=MyObjects(root, width... etc)
     Objects.grid(row... etc) #Same as layout for canvasBlank
     Objects.bind('<Button-3>', rightclickcanvas)
     Objectslist.append(Objects) #Stop garbage disposal and makes sure the canvas displays

-The MyObjects Class (in seperate module) has a form similar to:

from Coordinate_Generator import * #imports coordinate arrays

class MyObjects(tk.Canvas)
    def __init__(self, master, **kw)
        tk.Canvas.__init__(self, master, **kw)
        self.create_oval(coordinates[0], dimensions[0], fill... etc)
        self.create_oval(coordinates[1], dimensions[1], fill... etc)
#A series of bindings relating to moving objects under mouse clicks

The coordinates are determined using 'a', an arbitrary value. I try to multiply: scaler=[] a=70*scaler[-1]

This method doesn't seem to work either, and if it did, it also means potentially drawing a very large number of canvases over one another which I would like to avoid. I'm hoping this demonstrates the method I need to try and use more clearly. I have written a bit of code using the advice given, and while it may be useful for another part of the program I'm planning, it doesn't quite achieve what I am after. So I've cobbled together this 'Demonstration'to maybe illustrate what it is I'm trying to do.

Working Code (SOLUTION)

from Tkinter import *
from numpy import *
import Tkinter as tk

scale=1

class Demonstrator:

   def __init__(self, master=None): 
      global full_coordinates, dimensions, scale
      self.master=master
      self.master.title( "Demonstrator 2")
      self.master.grid()
      self.master.rowconfigure(0, weight=1)
      self.master.columnconfigure(0, weight=1)

      self.canvas = Canvas(self.master, width=300, height=300, bg='grey')
      self.canvas.grid(row=0, rowspan=3, column=0)
      self.canvas.create_rectangle(full_coordinates[0],dimensions[0], activefill='blue', fill='red')
      self.canvas.create_rectangle(full_coordinates[1],dimensions[1], activefill='blue', fill='red')
      self.canvas.create_line(full_coordinates[0],full_coordinates[1], fill='red')

      a=9*scale
      Originx=10
      Originy=35
      coordinates1=[]
      coordinates2=[]

      x,y,i=Originx,Originy,1
      x1,y1,i=Originx,Originy,1

      while len(coordinates1)<=25:
       coordinates1.append((x,y))
       coordinates2.append((x1,y1))

       i+=1
       if i % 2 == 0:
            x,y=x+a,y
            x1,y1=x1,y1+a
       else:
            x,y=x,y+a
            x1,y1=x1+a,y1

       full_coordinates=list(set(coordinates1+coordinates2))
       b=array(full_coordinates)
       k=b+10
       dimensions=k.tolist()

class Settings:
    def __init__(self, parent):

        top = self.top = tk.Toplevel(parent)
        self.top.title('Settings')

        self.spinbox_Label= tk.Label(top, text='Change Scale Factor?')
        self.spinbox_Label.grid(row=0, column=0, columnspan=2)

        self.spinbox_Label= tk.Label(top, width=30, text='Scale factor:')
        self.spinbox_Label.grid(row=1, column=0)

        self.spinbox= tk.Spinbox(top, from_=1, to=10, increment=0.1, command=self.change)
        self.spinbox.grid(row=1, column=1)


    def change(self):
        global scale
        scale=float(self.spinbox.get())
        MG=Demonstrator(root) #This just generates a new Demonstrator with original coordinates

def onClick():
    inputDialog = Settings(root)
    root.wait_window(inputDialog.top)

def onClick2():
    print scale

class coords:
    global full_coordinates, dimensions, scale
    print scale
    a=9*scale
    Originx=10
    Originy=35
    coordinates1=[]
    coordinates2=[]

    x,y,i=Originx,Originy,1
    x1,y1,i=Originx,Originy,1

    while len(coordinates1)<=25:
       coordinates1.append((x,y))
       coordinates2.append((x1,y1))

       i+=1
       if i % 2 == 0:
            x,y=x+a,y
            x1,y1=x1,y1+a
       else:
            x,y=x,y+a
            x1,y1=x1+a,y1

       full_coordinates=list(set(coordinates1+coordinates2))
       b=array(full_coordinates)
       k=b+10
       dimensions=k.tolist()    




root=Tk()
root.minsize=(700,700)
root.geometry=('600x600')
MG=Demonstrator(root)
mainButton2 = tk.Button(root, width=20, text='Print "scale"', command=onClick2)
mainButton2.grid(row=1, column=1)
mainButton = tk.Button(root, width=20, text='Settings', command=onClick)
mainButton.grid(row=2, column=1)
root.mainloop()
mainButton2.grid(row=1, column=1)
mainButton = tk.Button(root, width=20, text='Settings', command=onClick)
mainButton.grid(row=2, column=1)
root.mainloop()

The Question:
What is the best way to go about changing the size (by altering the coordinates) of the objects on the canvas using a spinbox?
I hope this is enough to info, of course I can supply more if necessary. I also apologise in advance for the formatting of this question, I'm new to this :)
(Solution added) Any help would be awesome. Cheers.
Mark

share|improve this question
2  
I don't see a question here. Are you asking how to use spinboxes? Toplevel windows? IntVars? Do you need help resizing objects on a canvas? Are you wanting us to write your code for you? –  Bryan Oakley Sep 4 '12 at 1:45
    
Sorry, no I'll edit the post for clarity. I know how to use spinboxes, toplevel windows and IntVars, I'm looking for a way to resize objects on the canvas using a spinbox in a toplevel window. I'll post my attempt too. I also don't need the code written explicitly, although a similar example might be useful. I apologise for the lack of clarity. –  MarkyD43 Sep 4 '12 at 12:02
    
About to try and implement your advice, thanks for the help, I'll let you know if it works. –  MarkyD43 Sep 4 '12 at 19:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's nothing special about the solution. You simply need to define a callback for the spinbox that adjusts the coordinates of the canvas items (which can be done with the coords method of the canvas).

First, you might want to create a dict to contain the base width and height of each item. The keys to this dictionary could also be tags associated with canvas items. For example:

self.base_dimensions = {
    "obj1": (10,10),
    "obj2": (20,20),
    ...
}

Next, create items on a canvas using those keys as tags. For example:

...
self.canvas.create_rectangle(..., tags=("obj1",))
self.canvas.create_rectangle(..., tags=("obj2",))
...

Finally, you can save the spinbox widgets in a dictionary using the same keys (so you can associate a spinbox with a canvas object), and assign the spinbox a callback to do the resizing. For example:

self.spinbox = {
    "obj1": tk.Spinbox(..., command=lambda self.do_resize("obj1")),
    "obj2": tk.Spinbox(..., command=lambda self.do_resize("obj2")),
    ...
}

Given a tag, your callback can use that to get the reference to the spinbox widget and get it's value, and then use the tag to tell the canvas object which item(s) to resize. For example:

def do_scale(self, tag):
    factor = int(self.spinbox[tag].get())
    (width, height) = self.default[tag]
    (x0,y0,x1,y1) = self.canvas.coords(tag)
    width = factor * width
    height = factor * height
    x1 = x0 + width
    y1 = y0 + height
    self.canvas.coords(tag, x0,y0,x1,y1)

Of course, there are endless ways to organize your data; what I've shown isn't the best way nor the only way. It might not even work for how you have your code organized. Whatever you choose, it boils down to being able to get the value out of the spinbox and using it to adjust the coordinates of the canvas items.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, I've tried implementing your method, but I don't think it's compatible with the way my coordinates are generated. My coordinates are in an array of length 30+, which means tagging each entry would be time consuming. I'm simply looking for a way of multiplying the entire array by the value of the spinbox. Then when the spinbox value is changed have the canvas immediately updated with the new coords. The effect would be that a user would go File -> Resize (spinbox widget) -> altering spinbox alters all canvas objects in real time. Sorry for my crappy explainations. –  MarkyD43 Sep 4 '12 at 23:29
    
@MarkyD43: I don't understand your comment about tagging your coordinates. I'm not quite sure what you mean by that, and I don't understand why you think it would be time consuming. Time consuming to type? To run? As for updating the items in real time, my example shows that. You can easily resize hundreds if not thousands of items when the user clicks on the spinbox. –  Bryan Oakley Sep 5 '12 at 1:53
    
I may very well be misunderstanding your advice, but my coordinates a generated automatically in a separate module from a few equations and one variable (which is the variable I'm after changing, in the example I gave it's simply 'a'), and as such I can't add tags to each set of coordinates as in your example. If I was building this from scratch I'd use your method, but unfortunately it's a feature I'm adding to a nearly finished program. I've updated my attempt above with a basic layout of the code to hopefully give context. Again, apologies for being slow at this, self-taught –  MarkyD43 Sep 5 '12 at 2:43
    
@MarkyD43: as long as you can associate the original coordinates with each item on the canvas it doesn't matter how you do it. The point is, you use a callback on the spinbox to multiply the original values by the value of the spinbox, and use the coords method to update the items on the canvas. –  Bryan Oakley Sep 5 '12 at 10:51
    
Okay, I'll give it another go. I'm wondering if the errors I'm getting when trying to do this are coming from the fact the coordinate generator (where the coordinate arrays are built), the canvas class where the objects are built, and the UI where the spinbox is are in three separate modules? I think I'm just getting confused, I appreciate the help though. –  MarkyD43 Sep 5 '12 at 13:33

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