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I was preallocating a big data.frame to fill in later, which I normally do with NA's like this:

n <- 1e6
a <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n, c2 = NA, c3 = NA)

and I wondered if it would make things any faster later if I specified data types up front, so I tested

f1 <- function() {
    a <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n, c2 = NA, c3 = NA)
    a$c2 <- 1:n
    a$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size= n, replace = TRUE)
}

f2 <- function() {
    b <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n, c2 = numeric(n), c3 = character(n))
    b$c2 <- 1:n
    b$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size= n, replace = TRUE)
}

> system.time(f1())
   user  system elapsed 
  0.219   0.042   0.260 
> system.time(f2())
   user  system elapsed 
  1.018   0.052   1.072 

So it was actually much slower! I tried again with a factor column too, and the difference wasn't closer to 2x than 4x, but I'm curious about why this is slower, and wonder if it is ever appropriate to initialize with data types rather than NA's.

--

Edit: Flodel pointed out that 1:n is integer, not numeric. With that correction the runtimes are nearly identical; of course it hurts to incorrectly specify a data type and change it later!

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1  
One clue: the class of 1:n is integer so you should initialize b$c2 as such. Otherwise, a lot of time is lost reallocating memory. –  flodel Sep 3 '12 at 23:47
    
@flodel, with that correction they're virtually identical. –  Gregor Sep 3 '12 at 23:53
1  
Remember that NA is of class logical (see ?NA). If you really wanted to prespecify a column filled with NA of other classes, then you could use NA_real_ or NA_character_ etc. However this is a bad idea (see @David Robinson's answer) –  mnel Sep 4 '12 at 0:11
1  
I'm a bit concerned that none of these examples are likely to return the data.frame whose creation you are timing. The last assignments are vectors rather than dataframes –  BondedDust Sep 4 '12 at 5:37
    
Good point @DWin, I've added some additional timing and profiling for the functions that will return the required data object –  mnel Sep 5 '12 at 2:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
+500

Assigning any data to a large data frame takes time. If you're going to assign your data all at once in a vector (as you should), it's much faster not to assign the c2 and c3 columns in the original definition at all. For example:

f3 <- function() {
    c <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n)
    c$c2 <- 1:n
    c$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size= n, replace = TRUE)
}

print(system.time(f1()))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.194   0.023   0.216 
print(system.time(f2()))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.336   0.037   0.374 
print(system.time(f3()))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.057   0.007   0.063 

The reason for this is that when you preassign, a column of length n is created. eg

str(data.frame(x=1:2, y = character(2)))
## 'data.frame':    2 obs. of  2 variables:
## $ x: int  1 2
## $ y: Factor w/ 1 level "": 1 1

Note that the character column has been converted to factor which will be slower than setting stringsAsFactors = F.

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1  
The basic problem ... accurately described in the first sentence ... and yet unsolved by anybody other than Matthew Dowle's data.table is the amount of copying done during the process of assignment to a data.frame. –  BondedDust Sep 5 '12 at 6:35

@David Robinson's answer is correct, but I will add some profiling here to show how to investigate why some thngs are slower than you might expect.

The best thing to do here is to do some profiling to see what is being called, that can give a clue as to why some things calls are slower than others

library(profr)
profr(f1())
## Read 9 items
##                 f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8              f1     1 0.16  0.00 0.16 FALSE   <NA>
## 9      data.frame     2 0.04  0.00 0.04  TRUE   base
## 10            $<-     2 0.02  0.04 0.06 FALSE   base
## 11         sample     2 0.04  0.06 0.10  TRUE   base
## 12            $<-     2 0.06  0.10 0.16 FALSE   base
## 13 $<-.data.frame     3 0.12  0.04 0.16  TRUE   base
profr(f2())
## Read 15 items
##                          f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8                       f2     1 0.28  0.00 0.28 FALSE   <NA>
## 9               data.frame     2 0.12  0.00 0.12  TRUE   base
## 10                       :     2 0.02  0.12 0.14  TRUE   base
## 11                     $<-     2 0.02  0.18 0.20 FALSE   base
## 12                  sample     2 0.02  0.20 0.22  TRUE   base
## 13                     $<-     2 0.06  0.22 0.28 FALSE   base
## 14           as.data.frame     3 0.08  0.04 0.12 FALSE   base
## 15          $<-.data.frame     3 0.10  0.18 0.28  TRUE   base
## 16 as.data.frame.character     4 0.08  0.04 0.12 FALSE   base
## 17                  factor     5 0.08  0.04 0.12 FALSE   base
## 18                  unique     6 0.06  0.04 0.10 FALSE   base
## 19                   match     6 0.02  0.10 0.12  TRUE   base
## 20          unique.default     7 0.06  0.04 0.10  TRUE   base
profr(f3())
## Read 4 items
##                f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8              f3     1 0.06  0.00 0.06 FALSE   <NA>
## 9             $<-     2 0.02  0.00 0.02 FALSE   base
## 10         sample     2 0.04  0.02 0.06  TRUE   base
## 11 $<-.data.frame     3 0.02  0.00 0.02  TRUE   base

clearly f2() is slower than f1() as there is a lot of character to factor conversions, and recreating levels etc.

For efficient use of memory I would suggest the data.table package. This avoids (as much as possible) the internal copying of objects

library(data.table)
f4 <- function(){
  f <- data.table(c1 = 1:n)
  f[,c2:=1L:n]
  f[,c3:=sample(LETTERS, size= n, replace = TRUE)]
}


system.time(f1())
##  user  system elapsed 
##  0.15    0.02    0.18 
system.time(f2())
## user  system elapsed 
## 0.19    0.00    0.19 
system.time(f3())
## user  system elapsed 
## 0.09    0.00    0.09 
system.time(f4())
## user  system elapsed 
## 0.04    0.00    0.04 

Note, that using data.table you could add two columns at once (and by reference)

  # Thanks to @Thell for pointing this out.
f[,`:=`(c('c2','c3'), list(1L:n, sample(LETTERS,n, T))), with = F]

EDIT -- functions that will return the required object (Well picked up @Dwin)

n= 1e7
f1 <- function() {
    a <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n, c2 = NA, c3 = NA)
    a$c2 <- 1:n
    a$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size = n, replace = TRUE)
    a
}

f2 <- function() {
    b <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n, c2 = numeric(n), c3 = character(n))
    b$c2 <- 1:n
    b$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size = n, replace = TRUE)
    b
}

f3 <- function() {
    c <- data.frame(c1 = 1:n)
    c$c2 <- 1:n
    c$c3 <- sample(LETTERS, size = n, replace = TRUE)
    c
}
f4 <- function() {
    f <- data.table(c1 = 1:n)
    f[, `:=`(c2, 1L:n)]
    f[, `:=`(c3, sample(LETTERS, size = n, replace = TRUE))]

}

system.time(f1())

##    user  system elapsed 
##    1.62    0.34    2.13 

system.time(f2())

##    user  system elapsed 
##    2.14    0.66    2.79 

system.time(f3())

##    user  system elapsed 
##    0.78    0.25    1.03 

system.time(f4())

##    user  system elapsed 
##    0.37    0.08    0.46 


profr(f1())
## Read 105 items
##                        f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8                     f1     1 2.08  0.00 2.08 FALSE   <NA>
## 9             data.frame     2 0.66  0.00 0.66 FALSE   base
## 10                     :     2 0.02  0.66 0.68  TRUE   base
## 11                   $<-     2 0.32  0.84 1.16 FALSE   base
## 12                sample     2 0.40  1.16 1.56  TRUE   base
## 13                   $<-     2 0.32  1.76 2.08 FALSE   base
## 14                     :     3 0.02  0.00 0.02  TRUE   base
## 15         as.data.frame     3 0.04  0.02 0.06 FALSE   base
## 16                unlist     3 0.12  0.54 0.66  TRUE   base
## 17        $<-.data.frame     3 1.24  0.84 2.08  TRUE   base
## 18 as.data.frame.integer     4 0.04  0.02 0.06  TRUE   base
profr(f2())
## Read 145 items
##                          f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8                       f2     1 2.88  0.00 2.88 FALSE   <NA>
## 9               data.frame     2 1.40  0.00 1.40 FALSE   base
## 10                       :     2 0.04  1.40 1.44  TRUE   base
## 11                     $<-     2 0.36  1.64 2.00 FALSE   base
## 12                  sample     2 0.40  2.00 2.40  TRUE   base
## 13                     $<-     2 0.36  2.52 2.88 FALSE   base
## 14                       :     3 0.02  0.00 0.02  TRUE   base
## 15                 numeric     3 0.06  0.02 0.08  TRUE   base
## 16               character     3 0.04  0.08 0.12  TRUE   base
## 17           as.data.frame     3 1.06  0.12 1.18 FALSE   base
## 18                  unlist     3 0.20  1.20 1.40  TRUE   base
## 19          $<-.data.frame     3 1.24  1.64 2.88  TRUE   base
## 20   as.data.frame.integer     4 0.04  0.12 0.16  TRUE   base
## 21   as.data.frame.numeric     4 0.16  0.18 0.34  TRUE   base
## 22 as.data.frame.character     4 0.78  0.40 1.18 FALSE   base
## 23                  factor     5 0.74  0.40 1.14 FALSE   base
## 24    as.data.frame.vector     5 0.04  1.14 1.18  TRUE   base
## 25                  unique     6 0.38  0.40 0.78 FALSE   base
## 26                   match     6 0.32  0.78 1.10  TRUE   base
## 27          unique.default     7 0.38  0.40 0.78  TRUE   base
profr(f3())
## Read 37 items
##                        f level time start  end  leaf source
## 8                     f3     1 0.72  0.00 0.72 FALSE   <NA>
## 9             data.frame     2 0.10  0.00 0.10 FALSE   base
## 10                     :     2 0.02  0.10 0.12  TRUE   base
## 11                   $<-     2 0.08  0.14 0.22 FALSE   base
## 12                sample     2 0.26  0.22 0.48  TRUE   base
## 13                   $<-     2 0.16  0.56 0.72 FALSE   base
## 14                     :     3 0.02  0.00 0.02  TRUE   base
## 15         as.data.frame     3 0.04  0.02 0.06 FALSE   base
## 16                unlist     3 0.02  0.08 0.10  TRUE   base
## 17        $<-.data.frame     3 0.58  0.14 0.72  TRUE   base
## 18 as.data.frame.integer     4 0.04  0.02 0.06  TRUE   base
profr(f4())
## Read 15 items
##               f level time start  end  leaf     source
## 8            f4     1 0.28  0.00 0.28 FALSE       <NA>
## 9    data.table     2 0.02  0.00 0.02 FALSE data.table
## 10            [     2 0.26  0.02 0.28 FALSE       base
## 11            :     3 0.02  0.00 0.02  TRUE       base
## 12 [.data.table     3 0.26  0.02 0.28 FALSE       <NA>
## 13         eval     4 0.26  0.02 0.28 FALSE       base
## 14         eval     5 0.26  0.02 0.28 FALSE       base
## 15            :     6 0.02  0.02 0.04  TRUE       base
## 16       sample     6 0.24  0.04 0.28  TRUE       base
share|improve this answer
    
I'm voting for this because of the profiling examples. And I suppose that fact that it highlights my need to learn to use data.table operations properly. –  BondedDust Sep 5 '12 at 6:37

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