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I have a data that arrives in this format:

[
  (1, "000010101001010101011101010101110101", "aaa", ... ),
  (0, "111101010100101010101110101010111010", "bb", ... ),
  (0, "100010110100010101001010101011101010", "ccc", ... ),
  (1, "000010101001010101011101010101110101", "ddd", ... ),
  (1, "110100010101001010101011101010111101", "eeee", ... ),
  ...
]

In tuple format, it looks like this:

(Y, X, other_info, ... )

At the end of the day, I need to train a classifier (e.g. sklearn.linear_model.logistic.LogisticRegression) using Y and X.

What's the most straightforward way to turn the string of ones and zeros into something like a np.array, so that I can run it through the classifier? Seems like there should be an easy answer here, but I haven't been able to think of/google one.

A few notes:

  • I'm already using numpy/pandas/sklearn, so anything in those libraries is fair game.
  • For a lot of what I'm doing, it's convenient to have the other_info columns together in a DataFrame
  • The strings are is pretty long (~20,000 columns), but the total data frame is not very tall (~500 rows).
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you asked primarily for a way to convert a string of ones and zeros into a numpy array, I'll offer my solution as follows:

d = '0101010000' * 2000 # create a 20,000 long string of 1s and 0s
d_array = np.fromstring(d, 'int8') - 48 # 48 is ascii 0. ascii 1 is 49

This compares favourable to @DSM's solution in terms of speed:

In [21]: timeit numpy.fromstring(d, dtype='int8') - 48
10000 loops, best of 3: 35.8 us per loop

In [22]: timeit numpy.fromiter(d, dtype='int', count=20000)
100 loops, best of 3: 8.57 ms per loop
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That's very fast! +1. –  DSM Sep 4 '12 at 11:33
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How about something like this:

Make the dataframe:

In [82]: v = [
   ....:     (1, "000010101001010101011101010101110101", "aaa"),
   ....:     (0, "111101010100101010101110101010111010", "bb"),
   ....:     (0, "100010110100010101001010101011101010", "ccc"),
   ....:     (1, "000010101001010101011101010101110101", "ddd"),
   ....:     (1, "110100010101001010101011101010111101", "eeee"),
   ....:     ]

In [83]: 

In [83]: df = pandas.DataFrame(v)

We can use fromiter or array to get an ndarray:

In [84]: d ="000010101001010101011101010101110101"

In [85]: np.fromiter(d, int) # better: np.fromiter(d, int, count=len(d))
Out[85]: 
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0,
       1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1])

In [86]: np.array(list(d), int)
Out[86]: 
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0,
       1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1])

There might be a slick vectorized way to do this, but I'd just apply the obvious per-entry function to the values and get on with my day:

In [87]: df[1]
Out[87]: 
0    000010101001010101011101010101110101
1    111101010100101010101110101010111010
2    100010110100010101001010101011101010
3    000010101001010101011101010101110101
4    110100010101001010101011101010111101
Name: 1

In [88]: df[1] = df[1].apply(lambda x: np.fromiter(x, int)) # better with count=len(x)

In [89]: df
Out[89]: 
   0                                                  1     2
0  1  [0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1    aaa
1  0  [1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0     bb
2  0  [1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0    ccc
3  1  [0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1    ddd
4  1  [1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1   eeee

In [90]: df[1][0]
Out[90]: 
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0,
       1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1])
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2  
don't forget to use the count keyword in fromiter, because we already know the size of d (it's more efficient that way, as the size of the output can be preallocated). –  Pierre GM Sep 4 '12 at 0:08
    
Good point! Ordinarily it'd be overkill, but at 20k maybe not! –  DSM Sep 4 '12 at 0:10
    
It's (about 3 times) faster still to use np.fromstring(d, 'int8') - 48. The 48 is the ascii value of 0 (and 49 is the ascii value of 1, so it works). –  Henry Gomersall Sep 4 '12 at 10:35
    
Actually, further to the last comment, for lengths of d around 20000, the speed difference is pretty substantial (36us versus 8.5ms on my machine). –  Henry Gomersall Sep 4 '12 at 10:48
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