Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying out JRuby, and I was trying to figure out how to use Java's double brace initialization. However, it is not that apparent how the syntax would be.

To keep this example simple, the below Java code would create a list containing an element:

List<String> foo = new ArrayList<String>() {{
  add("bar");
}};


Is this possible in JRuby, and if so, how?

ArrayList.new {{}} doesn't make sense and results in the error: odd number list for Hash.puts ArrayList.new({{}}).

share|improve this question
    
The double brace initialization is just creating an anonymous inner subclass of ArrayList<String> here. –  oldrinb Sep 4 '12 at 1:24
3  
Just because JRuby runs on the JVM doesn't mean it brings Java syntax to Ruby. –  echristopherson Sep 4 '12 at 6:00
    
@echristopherson I have updated the actual question so it doesn't sound too "demanding". –  whirlwin Sep 4 '12 at 16:54
1  
The double-brace initialization is a hacky workaround because Java doesn't have literal constructors like Ruby has. Why on earth wouldn't you just want to use the Ruby syntax? –  Mark Thomas Sep 4 '12 at 16:55
    
@MarkThomas In my opinion, I think it's cleaner to have the logic which has to do with initialization enclosed inside the braces. –  whirlwin Sep 4 '12 at 17:12
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think there is a way to do double curly brace initialization in JRuby. But for things like ArrayList Initialization JRuby offers shortcuts as in example below.

Please check https://github.com/jruby/jruby/wiki/CallingJavaFromJRuby for details.

>> a = ArrayList.new [:a, :b, "c", "d"]
#<Java::JavaUtil::ArrayList:0x65a953>
>> a[0]
:a
>> a[1]
:b
>> a[2]
"c"
>> a[3]
"d"
>> a[4]
nil
share|improve this answer
add comment

While not a direct answer to the question, am I adding this because this is a convenient way of having some logic determine what each element will be. This is done passing a Ruby Array into ArrayList's constructor.

ArrayList.new Array(10) {|i| i*i}

Thanks to Mark Thomas for helping me think. :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.