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From what I know, Primitive Types have the following characteristics:

Primitive Type  |  Size   |  Minimum  |     Maximum    |  Wrapper Type
boolean         |1—8 bits |   false   |     true       |  Boolean
char            | 16 bits | Unicode 0 | Unicode 2^16-1 |  Character
byte            |  8 bits |  -128     |     +127       |  Byte  
short           | 16 bits |  -2^15    |     +2^15-1    |  Short
int             | 32 bits |  -2^31    |     +2^31-1    |  Integer
long            | 64 bits |  -2^63    |     +2^63-1    |  Long
float           | 32 bits |  IEEE754  |     IEEE754    |  Float
double          | 64 bits |  IEEE754  |     IEEE754    |  Double
void            |    —    |     —     |        —       |  Void

I don't know how to implement some sample code using these wrapper classes. How do I?

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The wrapper classes are useful because instances of them aren't primitives, they're objects. This makes it possible to use them with generics, e.g. List<Integer>. Since Java 5, the language also supports automatic boxing and un-boxing of primitives to/from their respective wrapper types, which can greatly simplify code. –  oldrinb Sep 4 '12 at 2:28
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-1; as this does not show any research effort. There are loads of samples out there. –  home Sep 4 '12 at 2:30

1 Answer 1

You initialize and use the classes in the same way:

int i = 10;
Integer i = 10;

boolean isTrue = true;
Boolean isTrue = true; 
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See more in the relevant Java Tutorial on autoboxing. –  oldrinb Sep 4 '12 at 2:29

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