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Suppose I have two objective c++ objects that each wrap a native c++ object given:
A, B = objective c++ object types
Acpp, Bcpp = c++ object types

In B.mm

#import "Bcpp.h"
#import "B.h"
@interface B ()
{
    Bcpp myBcpp; // declare instance c++ variable of type Bcpp
}
@end

In A.mm

#import "Acpp.h"
#import "A.h"
@interface A ()
{
    Acpp myAcpp; // declare instance c++ variable of type Acpp
}
@end

@implementation A
// method to return an instance of B from an instance of A (self)
- (B)GetBfromA
{
    Bcpp *bfroma = myAcpp.GetBfromA(); // return c++ object
    // How do i find the objective C++ object B from its wrapped c++ instance bfroma?

}
@end

The reason for doing this is we have a mature c++ data structure and we wish to wrap it with objective c++ objects. Is the the best way? And if it is, how do we solve the reverse mapping problem?

EDIT: Thank you to the early responders but I have a more tricky situation that I implied above. Suppose the function GetBFromA() returns an instance of Bcpp that had already been declared (as an instance variable of an instance of B). So I am holding a pointer to a Bcpp object that is itself an instance variable of an objective C++ object of type B. How do I find the instance of B from the instance of Bcpp?

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well, sure it's answerable - using lots of private accesses and little abstraction layers which can perform the remapping and deferred construction and conversions. you also need to define copy and sharing semantics for your object graphs -- often, it's easiest to just keep it as c++. in your example, you just have to create a new B which references, shares, or copies the Bcpp. generally you do not want to push this objc countermap into your stable c++ layer. typically, Bcpp will not be aware of B. –  justin Sep 4 '12 at 4:33
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1 Answer

What you probably need to do is to be able to create a B from a Bcpp. So B will need to be amended to have an -initWithBcpp: method:

- (id)initWithBcpp:(Bcpp*)bcpp
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil)
    {
        myBcpp = *bcpp;
    }
    return self;
}

Then, in GetBFromA, you'll need to create a B from the Bcpp*:

- (B*)GetBfromA
{
    Bcpp *bfroma = myAcpp.GetBfromA(); // return c++ object
    B* result = [[B alloc] initWithBcpp:bfroma];
    return result;
}
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