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I've been attempting to design a efficient interface that I'm using for some plugins. I thought I had found a decent interface but trying to implement it is not going well. So I was hoping to see if anyone out here has some better suggestions as to how this could be done. It errors out with "does not contain a public definition for 'GetEnumerator'"

Plugin interface:

namespace ALeRT.PluginFramework
{
    public interface IQueryPlugin
    {
        string PluginCategory { get; }
        string Name { get; }
        string Version { get; }
        string Author { get; }
        System.Collections.Generic.List TypesAccepted { get; }
    }

    interface IQueryPluginRBool : IQueryPlugin
    {
        bool Result(string input, bool sensitive);
    }

    interface IQueryPluginRString : IQueryPlugin
    {
        string Result(string input, bool sensitive);
    }
}

In essence I am attempting to take a list of types that should be used (types could be URL, Name, Email, IP, etc.) and compare them to the value in the query plugin. Each query plugin can possibly have multiple types it accepts. When they match, it performs the actions that are in the query plugin.

    [ImportMany]
    public IEnumerable<IQueryPlugin> QPlugins { get; set; }

    private void QueryPlugins(List<string> val, bool sensitive)
    {
        foreach (string tType in val) //Cycle through a List<string>
        {
            foreach (var qPlugins in this.QPlugins) //Cycle through all query plugins
            {
                foreach (string qType in qPlugins) //Cycle though a List<string> within the IQueryPlugin interface AcceptedTypes
                {
                    if (qType == tType) //Match the two List<strings>, one is the AcceptedTypes and the other is the one returned from ITypeQuery
                    {
                          //Do stuff here
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
What is this.QPlugins? Could you show all code that is referenced in method QPlugins? –  Kirill Bestemyanov Sep 4 '12 at 5:03
    
Ahh sorry about that, added in the [ImportMany] in the second part of code. –  lordzero Sep 4 '12 at 13:16
    
Did you read my answer below? –  Kirill Bestemyanov Sep 4 '12 at 13:57
    
Yep and responded to it. Looks like it works, but I want to try out the other solution first since it does seem to clean up the code first before awarding who has the better answer. –  lordzero Sep 4 '12 at 18:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code

foreach (string qType in qPlugins)
{
    if (qType = tType)
        {
            //Do stuff here
        }
}

Will not work. You must iterate through qPlugins.TypeAccepted

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, once I changed that it all fell into place. I want to test the other solution since he brought up some good points regarding have the List<> available in the interface. –  lordzero Sep 4 '12 at 14:09
    
Decided to that the KISS (keep it simple stupid) principle for this problem. Thanks again! –  lordzero Sep 12 '12 at 4:16

First of all. Do not expose a list (like the line below) since it violates Law Of Demeter. That means that the plugin do not how control over it's own list. Anyone that have a reference to the plugin can modify the list.

System.Collections.Generic.List TypesAccepted { get; }

This is better:

IEnumerable<TheType> TypesAccepted { get; }

But that still let's anyone modify the elements of the list (without the knowledge of the plugin). It's fine if the elements are immutable.

A better solution would be to create methods in the plugin interface. For instance have a visitor pattern method:

public interface IPluginTypeVisitor
{
    void Visit(AcceptedType type);
}

public interface IQueryPlugin
{
    string PluginCategory { get; }
    string Name { get; }
    string Version { get; }
    string Author { get; }
    void VisitTypes(IPluginTypeVisitor visitor);
}

But the best solution in the case of your loop example is simply:

public interface IQueryPlugin
{
    string PluginCategory { get; }
    string Name { get; }
    string Version { get; }
    string Author { get; }
    bool IsTypeAcceptable(TheTypeType type); // get it, thetypetype? hahaha
}

private void QueryPlugins(List<string> val, bool sensitive)
{
    foreach (string tType in val) //Cycle through a List<string>
    {
        foreach (var plugin in this.QPlugins) //Cycle through all query plugins
        {
            if (plugin.IsTypeAcceptable(tType))
                //process it here
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That actually makes a lot of sense. I'll try it out when I get back to the computer later and let you know how it goes. –  lordzero Sep 4 '12 at 14:08
    
So there is one thing I don't like about this method. It requires that the plugin do the matching. I would rather that happen from within the PluginFramework. Also I want only one method call to the Plugin such as: public interface IQueryPluginRBool : IQueryPlugin { bool Result(string input, bool sensitive); } It would be great if it didn't need to know the type when executing the method too. Any ideas? –  lordzero Sep 6 '12 at 1:58

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