Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have used the GPUImage framework for a blur effect similar to that of the Instagram application, where I have made a view for getting a picture from the photo library and then I put an effect on it.

One of the effects is a selective blur effect in which only a small part of the image is clear the rest is blurred. The GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter chooses the circular part of the image to not be blurred.

How can I alter this to make the sharp region be rectangular in shape instead?

share|improve this question
    
Here's a hint: the middle two lines in the GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter's custom fragment shader control the shape of the in-focus area. You should be able to alter those to do this pretty easily. –  Brad Larson Sep 4 '12 at 17:45
    
Thanx Brad, just modified those 2 lines and now I have a rectangular cut, your code helped me a lot . Thanks once again :) –  IronManGill Sep 5 '12 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because Gill's answer isn't exactly correct, and since this seems to be getting asked over and over, I'll clarify my comment above.

The fragment shader for the selective blur by default has the following code:

 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;
 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate2;

 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;
 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture2; 

 uniform lowp float excludeCircleRadius;
 uniform lowp vec2 excludeCirclePoint;
 uniform lowp float excludeBlurSize;
 uniform highp float aspectRatio;

 void main()
 {
     lowp vec4 sharpImageColor = texture2D(inputImageTexture, textureCoordinate);
     lowp vec4 blurredImageColor = texture2D(inputImageTexture2, textureCoordinate2);

     highp vec2 textureCoordinateToUse = vec2(textureCoordinate2.x, (textureCoordinate2.y * aspectRatio + 0.5 - 0.5 * aspectRatio));
     highp float distanceFromCenter = distance(excludeCirclePoint, textureCoordinateToUse);

     gl_FragColor = mix(sharpImageColor, blurredImageColor, smoothstep(excludeCircleRadius - excludeBlurSize, excludeCircleRadius, distanceFromCenter));
 }

This fragment shader takes in a pixel color value from both the original sharp image and a Gaussian blurred version of the image. It then blends between these based on the logic of the last three lines.

The first and second of these lines calculate the distance from the center coordinate that you specify ((0.5, 0.5) in normalized coordinates by default for the dead center of the image) to the current pixel's coordinate. The last line uses the smoothstep() GLSL function to smoothly interpolate between 0 and 1 when the distance from the center point travels between two thresholds, the inner clear circle, and the outer fully blurred circle. The mix() operator then takes the output from the smoothstep() and fades between the blurred and sharp color pixel colors to produce the appropriate output.

If you just want to modify this to produce a square shape instead of the circular one, you need to adjust the two center lines in the fragment shader to base the distance on linear X or Y coordinates, not a Pythagorean distance from the center point. To do this, change the shader to read:

 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate;
 varying highp vec2 textureCoordinate2;

 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture;
 uniform sampler2D inputImageTexture2; 

 uniform lowp float excludeCircleRadius;
 uniform lowp vec2 excludeCirclePoint;
 uniform lowp float excludeBlurSize;
 uniform highp float aspectRatio;

 void main()
 {
     lowp vec4 sharpImageColor = texture2D(inputImageTexture, textureCoordinate);
     lowp vec4 blurredImageColor = texture2D(inputImageTexture2, textureCoordinate2);

     highp vec2 textureCoordinateToUse = vec2(textureCoordinate2.x, (textureCoordinate2.y * aspectRatio + 0.5 - 0.5 * aspectRatio));

     textureCoordinateToUse = abs(excludeCirclePoint - textureCoordinateToUse);
     highp float distanceFromCenter = max(textureCoordinateToUse.x, textureCoordinateToUse.y);

     gl_FragColor = mix(sharpImageColor, blurredImageColor, smoothstep(excludeCircleRadius - excludeBlurSize, excludeCircleRadius, distanceFromCenter));
 }

The lines that Gill mentions are just input parameters for the filter, and don't control its circularity at all.

I leave modifying this further to produce a generic rectangular shape as an exercise for the reader, but this should provide a basis for how you could do this and a bit more explanation of what the lines in this shader do.

share|improve this answer

Did it ... the code for the rectangular effect is just in these 2 lines

blurFilter = [[GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter alloc] init];
        [(GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter*)blurFilter      setExcludeCircleRadius:80.0/320.0];
        [(GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter*)blurFilter setExcludeCirclePoint:CGPointMake(0.5f, 0.5f)];
       // [(GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter*)blurFilter setBlurSize:0.0f];            [(GPUImageGaussianSelectiveBlurFilter*)blurFilter setAspectRatio:0.0f];
share|improve this answer
1  
Where exactly are you setting a rectangular area here in the code??? –  nik Nov 21 '12 at 11:24
    
@nik Well I had a whole lot of code which i cudnt put up here ... :) if u want i can provide it to u... –  IronManGill Nov 21 '12 at 11:51
    
I'll be glad... –  nik Nov 21 '12 at 12:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.