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Along with a basic doubt I had here(which unfortunately did not get much attention) I have another basic doubt in context with preparing a Java Framework for Selenium-WebDriver. I am not satisfied with the answers here and need some quality advice on best practices from real world case scenarios. (Counting on SO)

The main question is - Which one is better suited for Selenium? TestNG or JUnit? And Why?

I got some basic differences here,here(for Automation but unclear answers -all ask to pick one) and many more. Looking for some more details which will help me decide better.

P.S: I have experience with Selenium+JUnit. Will I regret if I go the same way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

simplicity with JUnit vs. adjustability with TestNG - that's all

Firstly, both work quite well.

If you want to scale down your execution time and have enough time to find out the best possible configuration I would recommend TestNG. In case of parallelization that's your tool

If you prefer the plainness of a top down execution JUnit is what you're looking for

--EDIT--

Regarding JUnit 3

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Ah! Frank!! Well which one do you use for your Selenium Tests?? –  Some_other_guy Sep 4 '12 at 7:07
    
Previous JUnit and now TestNG... as I said TestNG needs some research if you want to use the enhancements, but it is very well documented. You can also use it like JUnit- just top down execution –  Franz Ebner Sep 4 '12 at 7:10
    
Why did you shift from JUnit to TestNG? I am actually looking for answer to such questions. –  Some_other_guy Sep 4 '12 at 7:13
    
For simple Selenium testing is TestNG required? But I need a robust framework which we intend to maintain for a long time. And which framework is better for non-coder who might need to update locators etc? –  Some_other_guy Sep 4 '12 at 7:20
1  
The best for non- coders who want to start testing is either learn to code or test manually. I switched because of horizontal scaling. –  Franz Ebner Sep 4 '12 at 7:41

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